Teaching Materials

In the book we presented shorts lists of materials we found most useful, but in many cases there are many more materials. We present them here as well. This is a collaborative project trying to create an overview of useful teaching material for economics education. We build on the great work of many others and hope that many will continue to this collective endeavour, expanding and refining these overviews. Feedback and suggestions are therefore very welcome, contact us here.

General Resources

New Teaching Materials

The work of collecting good teaching materials that can help educators and students learn about often neglected aspects is luckily never over and finished. Since the publication of the book many useful new teaching materials have been published. On this page we provide an overview of new teaching materials.

Building Block 1: Introducing the Economy

  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapters 1 & 2. Perhaps the most accessible and yet insightful introduction book into economics, with particular attention to why it is relevant to learn economics and what economics is in the first place.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Molly S. Cato, Maria A. C. Madi, from 2018, chapters 1, 3, 4, & 5. An accessible textbook which introduces students to what economics is, how it is embedded in society and the environment, and major societal challenges, such as climate change, poverty, financial instability, and inequality.
  • Principles of economics in context by Neva Goodwin, Jonathan M. Harris, Julie A. Nelson, Brian Roach, Mariano Torras, most recent edition from 2019, chapters 0, 1, 20, and 21. This economics textbook covers many of the traditional economic topics, but pays more attention to why studying the economy is relevant and concerns, such as human wellbeing, ecological sustainability, distributional equity, and the quality of employment.
  • To help students get an idea of the main societal challenges of today, it can be useful to have them take a look at reports, such as the Sustainable Development Goals Reports, World Development Reports, and World Happiness Reports. It can also be useful to use more engaging types of materials, such as documentaries and coverage of political protests and debates. Furthermore, it can be interesting and useful for students to also be exposed to material on the key issues in the domestic, rather than global, economy.
  • Economists and Societies by Marion Fourcade, from 2009. This book presents a great historical overview of the societal role economists have had in the United States, Britain and France. For students of one of these countries, reading the introduction, conclusion and chapter devoted to their country can be very insightful in better understanding the role of economists in their society. For courses taught in other countries, it would help to find similar material on their own country. For us as Dutch citizens, for example, a useful additional resource would be the book Telgen van Tinbergen: Het verhaal van de Nederlandse economen by Harry van Dalen and Arjo Klamer, from 1996.

Building Block 2: Know Your Own Economy

It is hard to suggest specific teaching material for this building block, as its contents will vary so much between different regions and countries. To give some idea of what kind of materials could be used to teach students about their own economy, we provide some example materials on the Dutch economy.

The following three books seem to be most useful when teaching students about the Dutch economy:

  • De Economie in Nederland: Theorie en Werkelijkheid [The Economy in the Netherlands: Theory and Reality] by Hans Buunk, most recent edition from 2011. A highly informative and accessible introduction into the Dutch economy as well as basic economic concepts, covering topics such as Dutch capitalist history, market competition, finance, industrial and social policy, and labour relations.
  • Sociale Kaart van Nederland: Over Instituties en Organisaties [The Social Map of the Netherlands: About Institutions and Organizations] by Jan W. Duyvendak, Carolien Bouw, Klarita Gërxhani, and Olav Velthuis, most recent edition from 2013. An unique and accessible overview of Dutch society that introduces students to its many different domains and how they are structured, from education, healthcare, and housing, to business, labour and social security.
  • Varieties of Capitalism and Business History: The Dutch Case by Keetie E. Sluyterman, from 2015. This collection of essays explores the Dutch variety of capitalism and institutions, with special attention to its labour relations, corporate governance, inter-firm relations, knowledge infrastructure, and its famous corporatist consultative ‘polder model’.

Besides books, it can be useful for students to look up statistics and read reports on economic sectors and issues. Naturally, national statistical authorities are a good place to look for these, but economic ministries, central banks, and policy research institutions, can also be helpful for finding useful material. For the Netherlands, one could have a look at the websites of Centraal Bureau voor de Statistiek [Central Agency for Statistics], De Nederlandsche Bank [Dutch Central Bank], Centraal Planbureau [Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis], Planbureau voor de Leefomgeving [Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency], Sociaal en Cultureel Planbureau [Netherlands Institute for Social Research], and Wetenschappelijke Raad voor het Regeringsbeleid [Scientific Council for Government Policy].

Furthermore, domestic journals can often be useful as they frequently do not only publish general academic work but also research describing particularities of the national economy and its issues. For the Netherlands, the following three journals have plenty of interesting and helpful material: Economisch Statistische Berichten [Economic Statistical Messages], MeJudice, and Tijdschrift voor Politieke Ekonomie [Journal for Political Economy].

Depending on the program, one could also look for more specialised material that does not cover the economy in general, but focuses on a specific element or aspect of it. In a master programme on public economics in the Netherlands, the following two books could, for example, be of use:

  • Overheidsfinanciën [Public finance] by Flip de Kam, Wimar Bolhuis en Jasper Lukkezen, from 2021.
  • De rekenmeesters van de politiek [The math masters of politics] by Wimar Bolhuis, from 2017.

Finally, one could also use more opinionated but still informative materials on the economy or an economic issue. For the Netherlands, the following recent books, and chapters from it, could, for example, serve this purpose:

  • Over de dijken [Over the dikes] by Coen Teulings, from 2018.
  • Een land van kleine buffers [A country of small reserves] by Dirk Bezemer, from 2020.
  • Fantoomgroei [Phantom growth] by Sander Heijne en Hendrik Noten, from 2020.
  • Met ons gaat het nog altijd goed [We are still doing well] by Peter Hein van Mulligen, 2020.
  • Ontspoord Kapitalisme [Derailed Capitalism] by Bert de Vries, from 2020.

Building Block 3: Economic History

  • Capitalism: A Short History by Jürgen Kocka, from 2016. A concise and yet broad-ranging account of how capitalism developed from early merchants, colonialism and slavery to the recent wave of globalisation and financialisation, accompanied by discussions of capitalism’s key thinkers, such as Smith, Marx, Weber, and Schumpeter.
  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapters 2 & 3. Two short and well written chapters on how the economy has changed over the last centuries and how capitalism evolved.
  • Global Economic History: A Very Short Introduction by Robert C. Allen, from 2011. A brief but insightful introduction into the economic history of the world with chapters on industrialisation, the rise of the West, great empires, the Americas and Africa.
  • An Economist’s Guide to Economic History by Matthias Blum and Christopher L. Colvin, from 2018. A useful collection of short essays on the economic histories of many different regions, periods, methods and topics, from globalisation and labour markets to the environment and children.
  • A History of the Global Economy: 1500 to the Present by Joerg Baten, from 2016. A broad collection of essays on the histories of the different regions in the world, with chapters on the economic consequences of independence in Latin America, US business history and the workings and impact of colonial empires in Africa and Asia.
  • Besides these global histories, it can be particularly useful to look up materials on national economic history. For the Netherlands, for example, this book would be useful: The Economic History of The Netherlands 1914-1995: A Small Open Economy in the ‘Long’ Twentieth Century by Jan L. van Zanden, from 1997.
  • The Worldly Philosophers: The Lives, Times and Ideas of the Great Economic Thinkers by Robert Heilbroner, most recent edition from 1999. While first published in 1953, it remains perhaps the best introduction into the history of economic thought to this day. In a remarkably well-written and accessible manner it discusses the ideas of key economists and puts them into historical context.
  • Grand Pursuit: The Story of Economic Genius by Sylvia Naser, from 2012. Another very accessible but more recent book introducing the history of economic thought through captivating narratives.
  • Economic Methodology: A Historical Introduction by Harro Maas, from 2014. A well-written and useful book on the history of economic methodology from debates about deduction and induction, statistics, modelling, and experiments in economics.
  • The History of Economic Thought Website made by INET: http://www. hetwebsite.net/het/. A useful collection of material and discussions of different schools of thought, historical periods and institutions.
  • A Companion to the History of Economic Thought by Warren J. Samuels, Jeff E. Biddle, and John B. Davis, from 2003. An extensive and detailed collection of contributions covering many periods and developments in the history of economic thought, as well as covering historiography and different ways of approaching that history.
  • Routledge Handbook of the History of Women’s Economic Thought by Kirsten Madden and Robert W. Dimand, from 2019. A unique history of economic thought book focusing on the too often ignored contributions of women around the world.

If one is looking for more standardised textbooks, these three other options might be useful.

  • History of Economic Thought by David Colander and Harry Landreth, from 2001, is accessible and transparently opinionated, triggering students to think for themselves and form their own opinion.
  • History of Economic Thought by E. K. Hunt and Mark Lautzenheiser, most recent edition from 2015, is written from an explicitly critical perspective on the current mainstream profession and reflects upon great thinkers of the past, how today’s dominant approach developed and approaches that have been pursued at the margins of the discipline.
  • A History of Economic Theory & Method by Robert B. Ekelund and Robert F. Hébert, most recent edition from 2016, is the most extensive of the three and covers the classics as well as more innovative topics such as economics’ relation to art, religion, archaeology, technology and ideology.
  • As with economic history, national history is always particularly relevant. The Routledge History of Economic Thought book series can be useful for this, as it contains books on many countries, such as A History of Indian Economic Thought by Ajit K. Dasgupta from 2015, The History of Swedish Economic Thought by Bo Sandelin, most recent edition from 2012, and Studies in the History of Latin American Economic Thought by Oreste Popescu, from 2014.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Molly S. Cato, Maria A. C. Madi, from 2018, chapters 10, 11 & 12. Three accessible and brief chapters, with accompanying classroom activities and questions, introducing students to what public goods, commons and firms are and how they can be governed, for example as a corporation owned by shareholders or as a cooperative owned by its workers or consumers.
  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 5. A short well-written chapter on different economic actors and organisational forms, from multinational corporations, cooperatives, and labour unions, to governments and a variety of international organisations.
  • Organisations: A Very Short Introduction by Mary Jo Hatch, from A brief, accessible and yet highly informative book full with scientific theories and ideas on what organisations are, how they can be structured, how they change, and their internal dynamics and interaction with markets and society.
  • Governing the Commons: The Evolution of Institutions for Collective Action by Elinor Ostrom, most recent edition from 2015, chapters 1, 2 & 3. A sharp and rigorous discussion of commons, how they are different from markets and hierarchies, how we should theorize them and real-world examples that help us better understand how they can be successful.
  • Contemporary Capitalism: The Embeddedness of Institutions by J. Rogers Hollingsworth and Robert Boyer, most recent edition from 2012, chapter 1. An instructive analytical introduction and overview of different coordination and allocation mechanisms, such as markets, public and private hierarchies, networks, communities and associations.
  • Sustaining the Commons by John Anderies & Marco Janssen, from 2016. This book is online freely available in English and Spanish. It introduces undergraduate students to the main framework, concepts and applications of the work of Ostrom and her colleagues.

Building Block 6: Political-Economic Systems

  • Capitalism by Geoffrey Ingham, from 2008. A highly insightful introduction into capitalism with chapters on key ideas from Smith, Marx, Weber, Schumpeter and Keynes, and core institutions, such as market exchange, the enterprise, money, capital, financial markets and the state.
  • Capitalism: A Very Short Introduction by James Fulcher, most recent edition from 2015. A brief and yet useful book on capitalism’s definition, historical evolution, varieties, global networks, and recurring crises.
  • Socialism: A Very Short Introduction by Michael Newman, most recent edition from 2020. A similarly brief and yet useful book, but then on capitalism’s main rival socialism, with chapters on its varieties around the world, historical traditions and more recent developments.
  • Is Capitalism Obsolete? A Journey Through Alternative Economic Systems by Giacomo Corneo, from 2017. A systematic and sharp overview of different (mainly socialist) economic systems that helps students think analytically about their allocation and coordination mechanisms and informs them about the possible ways of organising economies and the arguments for and against the various options.
  • Comparative economics in a transforming world economy by J. Barkley Rosser, Jr. and Marina V. Rosser, most recent edition from 2018. A highly useful and broad book describing many varieties of advanced market capitalism, varieties of transition among socialist economies, and alternative paths among developing economies, with chapters on many countries, such as the United States, Russia, Sweden, China, India, Iran, South Africa, Mexico, and Brazil. It is particularly useful for students to learn about their own country. If this country is not included in the book, as is the case for us as Dutch citizens, it can be useful to supplement the book with teaching material on the national political-economic system.
  • Rise and Demise: Comparing World-Systems by Christopher Chase-Dunn and Thomas D. Hall, most recent edition from 2018. A concise analytical overview of the political-economic systems that have characterised human history, with chapters on concepts and definitions, theories of change, cases and periods.
  • International Organizations: Politics, Law, Practice by Ian Hurd, most recent edition from 2020, chapters 1, 5, 6 & 7. A leading textbook on international organisations with chapters on various key economic international organisations, such as the World Trade Organization (WTO), the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank, and the International Labor Organization (ILO).
  • Economic Methodology: Understanding economics as a science by Marcel Boumans and John B. Davis, most recent edition from 2015. A sharp and accessible introduction into economic methodology and philosophy of science with explanations of different views on science and key debates on how economics should be practiced.
  • Social Research Methods by Alan Bryman, most recent edition from 2015. A prominent textbook that introduces a wide variety of quantitative and qualitative research methods, such as interviews, structured and participant observation, content analysis, and survey research.
  • The SAGE Handbook of Applied Social Research Methods by Leonard Bickman and Debra J. Rog, most recent edition from 2009. A leading textbook on applied research with attention to choosing the right method for the question at hand, practical considerations, and how to make informed methodological decisions for a variety of quantitative and qualitative methods.
  • Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Heterodox Economics by Frederic Lee and Bruce Cronin, from 2016. An instructive collection of essays with explanations, reflections on and applications of innovative research methods that deviate from the standard econometric approach usually taught in economics programmes, such as survey research, network analysis, experiments, ethnography, and agent-based computational modelling.
  • Qualitative Research Practice A Guide for Social Science Students and Researchers by Jane Ritchie, Jane Lewis, Carol McNaughton Nicholls, and Rachel Ormston, most recent edition from 2013. A useful introduction into how to do rigorous and reflective quantitative research with chapters on interviews, focus groups, observation, research design, ethical considerations, and data analysis.

Building Block 8: Economic Theories

Especially since the Global Financial Crisis of 2007-2008, a wide variety of textbooks has been published to facilitate topic-based pluralist economic teaching. Following every topic-summary in the online resources for this book (finance, labour, nature, etc.), we suggest literature for that specific topic. A few of these textbooks deserve specific mention, because they are useful in teaching several of the topics and approaches. We will introduce them in order from introductory to advanced.

  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014. This book provides a brief and accessible pluralist introduction to a broad range of theoretical insights the discipline has to offer. While theoretical, this book is never dry. It is clearly written and has a very succinct style.
  • Rethinking Economics: An Introduction to Pluralist Economics by Liliann Fischer, Joe Hasell, J. Christopher Proctor, David Uwakwe, Zach Ward Perkins, Catriona Watson, from 2017. This collection of essays provides an accessible introduction into post-Keynesian, Marxian, Austrian, institutional, feminist, behavioural, complexity and ecological economics.
  • Exploring Economics: www.exploring-economics.org/en/. This website provides sharp and helpful introductions into the different economic perspectives and furthermore gives many useful overviews of related teaching materials, videos and existing (online) courses.
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020. A useful textbook that treats much of the traditional content, but also consistently discusses the social and environmental challenges inherent in economic questions.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015. This well-written textbook describes twelve central topics in economics at an introductory level, each from four different perspectives: the neoclassical, institutional, social and post-Keynesian perspectives.
  • The Economy by the CORE Team, from 2017. This highly successful textbook, freely available online with additional resources, provides a treasure trove of empirical data, context and recent research.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017. This ground-breaking textbook introduces many of the core issues in economics today and weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge in an eminently readable way.
  • Political Economy: The Contest of Economic Ideas by Frank Stilwell, most recent edition from 2011. This well-written textbook provides a good introduction to economic ideas from multiple perspectives, with particular attention to classical, Marxist, neoclassical, institutional, Keynesian and more recent insights related to capitalism.
  • Foundations of Real-World Economics by John Komlos, from 2019. This textbook is perhaps the most critical of this list, providing a sharp criticism of the neoclassical school as well as providing a wealth of empirical data and findings.
  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016. This impressive and extensive book covers many traditional economic topics and compares multiple perspectives on each including classical, Marxian, neoclassical, Austrian, Keynesian, complexity and several others, as well as testing them against empirical data. Not light reading, but very much worth it.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017. This collection of essays discusses a great variety of economic topics and theories, from theories of production, value and prices, to theories of finance, the environment, and the state.
  • The Microeconomics of Complex Economies: Evolutionary, Institutional, Neoclassical and Complexity Perspectives by Wolfram Elsner, Torsten Heinrich, and Henning Schwardt, from 2014. This innovative textbook makes readers familiar with new insights coming from frontier mainstream economic research, with particular attention to game theory, agent-based modelling, system dynamics, and empirical realities.
  • Macroeconomics by William Mitchell, L. Randall Wray, Martin Watts, from 2019. This ground-breaking and much-discussed textbook written by three leaders of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT), describes in detail the history of economic thinking about the state and macroeconomy as well as recent theoretical and policy debates.

Building Block 9: Problems & Proposals

  • To introduce the policy tools, reading materials can be of use, but they will probably have the most lasting impact when combined with practical exercises in which students have to apply the tools themselves.
    • For cost-benefit analysis, a useful book is: Cost-Benefit Analysis: Concepts and Practice by Anthony E. Boardman, David H. Greenberg, Aidan R. Vining, David L. Weimer, most recent edition from 2018.
    • For participatory evaluation, the following book can be of help: Participatory Evaluation Up Close: An Integration of Research Based Knowledge by J. Bradley Cousins and Jill A. Chouinard, from 2012.
    • Risk-opportunity analysis is newer and has yet to be explained in a textbook, but a useful working paper explaining the tool and providing examples of applications is: Risk-opportunity analysis for transformative policy design and appraisal by Jean-Francois Mercure, Simon Sharpe, Jorge Vinuales, Matthew Ives, Michael Grubb, Hector Pollitt, Florian Knobloch and Femke Nijsse, from 2020.
  • A useful and accessible book about systems thinking is: Thinking in Systems: A Primer by Donella H. Meadows and Diana Wright, most recent edition from 2015. Another helpful book is Systems Thinking For Social Change by David P. Stroh, from 2015. A website providing an overview and links to explanation texts and courses is: http://learningforsustainability.net/systems-thinking/
  • The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy by Robert E. Goodin, Michael Moran, and Martin Rein, from 2008. An extensive book, which provides a useful overview of different aspects of public policy, such as the role of economic policy tools, engagement of stakeholders, and producing and evaluating policy.
  • Handbook of Policy Formulation by Michael Howlett and Ishani Mukherjee, from 2017. Another extensive book, which focuses on how policy is made with its different aspects, such as choosing policy goals and instruments, policy appraisal techniques, and the politics of defining and resolving policy problems.

Building Block 10: Economics for a Better World

  • The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and Economics by Mark D. White, from This extensive collection of essays explores the many moral dimensions of economics, from different ethical theories and the ethics in schools of thought, to the ethics of money, labour markets, risk, law, civil rights and ecological sustainability.
  • Economic Analysis, Moral Philosophy, and Public Policy by Daniel Hausman, Michael McPherson, and Debra Satz, most recent edition from 2016. A great introduction into normative economics, covering its many areas and topics from welfare economics and utility theory to liberty, equality and justice.
  • A Guide to Ethics and Public Policy: Finding Our Way by D. Don Welch, from 2014. A brief but insightful book providing a broad framework for evaluating policy proposals and outcomes, organised around five moral principles: benefit, effectiveness, fairness, fidelity, and legitimacy.
  • The Oxford Handbook of Professional Economic Ethics by George F. DeMartino and Deirdre McCloskey, from 2016. This insightful collection of essays explores the different aspects of ethics in economics, with special attention to ethical issues related to economic theory, research and policy advice.
  • Political Ideologies: An Introduction by Andrew Heywood, most recent edition from 2021. A useful and accessible introduction into a wide variety of political ideologies, from liberalism, socialism, and conservatism to feminism, nationalism, and green ideology, that shape much of our normative thinking on the economy.
  • Moral Views on Market Society by Marion Fourcade and Kieran Healy, from 2007. An insightful overview paper on the key different normative perspectives on capitalism, enabling readers to better understand and place ideas and arguments prevalent in many debates about the economy.
  • Is Capitalism Obsolete? A Journey Through Alternative Economic Systems by Giacomo Corneo, from 2017. A systematic and sharp overview of different (mainly socialist) economic systems that helps students think analytically about their allocation and coordination mechanisms and informs them about the possible ways of organising economies and the arguments for and against the various options.
  • What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets by Michael J. Sandel, most recent edition from 2012. A highly influential and well-written book reflecting on the moral place of markets in society and asking the key question whether everything should be up for sale. The Institute for New Economic Thinking has also launched a video series on the book and topic: https://www.ineteconomics.org/perspectives/videos/what-money-cant-buy
  • Thrive: Fundamentals for a New Economy by Kees Klomp & Shinta Oosterwaal, from 2021. This collection of essays introduces students to various visions for how the economy could be run, from regenerative, wellbeing and common good economics, to doughnut, buddhist and degrowth economics.
  • The New Systems Reader: Alternatives to a Failed Economy by James Gustave Speth, Kathleen Courrier, from 2020. This collection of essays helps students better understand existing and alternative economic systems, like Nordic social democratic capitalism, post-growth horizontal governance system, economic democracy, eco-socialism, and participatory economics.

Pragmatic Pluralism

Chapters

  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 11. This brief and accessible pluralist book contains a useful introductory chapter on the role of the state.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 6. This well-written textbook sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on the state.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapters 14, 15 and 22. This successful textbook provides an introduction into mainstream ideas and empirical findings on fiscal, monetary and public policy. 
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapters 12 and 25. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, devotes two chapters to tax and fiscal policy in specific. 
  • The Microeconomics of Complex Economies: Evolutionary, Institutional, Neoclassical and Complexity Perspectives by Wolfram Elsner, Torsten Heinrich, and Henning Schwardt, from 2014, chapter 17. This innovative textbook makes readers familiar with new insights coming from frontier mainstream economic research, with one chapter devoted to the policy implications of the findings discussed in the book.
  • Macroeconomics by William Mitchell, L. Randall Wray, Martin Watts, from 2019, chapters 20, 21, 22 and 23. This ground-breaking and much-discussed textbook written by three leaders of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT), describes in detail the history of economic thinking about the state and macroeconomy as well as recent theoretical and policy debates.
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapters 22, 23 and 24. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including three chapters on the role of the state in the economy.

Books:

  • The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths by Mariana Mazzucato, from 2013. An influential and well-written book, inspired chiefly by evolutionary economics, on the role of the state in innovation.
  • Alternative Theories of the State by S. Pressman, from 2006. A useful and informative collection of essays which introduces readers to the institutional, Marxist, post-Keynesian, feminist and behavioural perspectives on the state.
  • Money and Government: The Past and Future of Economics by Robert Skidelsky, from 2018. This well-written and insightful book introduces readers to historical and current debates about the state, with particular attention to neoclassical and Keynesian ideas.
  • Political Economy: The Contest of Economic Ideas by Frank Stilwell, most recent edition from 2011. A well-written textbook, with parts devoted to classical, Marxist, neoclassical, institutional, and Keynesian economics and particular attention to ideas surrounding the state, reform, policy and economic systems.
  • Routledge Handbook of International Political Economy by Mark Blyth, from 2009. A useful and extensive book which provides an overview of the wide field of international political economy with particular attention to its North American, British, and Asian branches.
  • Frontiers of Heterodox Macroeconomics by Philip Arestis and Malcolm Sawyer, from 2019. A useful collection of essays on recent insights coming from unconventional thinkers, and in particular post-Keynesian economists.
  • Handbook of Public Economics, Volume 5 by Alan J. Auerbach, Raj Chetty, Martin Feldstein, and Emmanuel Saez, from 2013. Another useful collection of recent insights coming from mainstream economists on topics, such social insurance, charitable giving, urban public finance, and taxing labour, wealth, and internationally.

Chapters & Papers: 

  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 10. This well-written textbook sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on macroeconomic flows in a single chapter, side-by-side.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapters 13 & 17. This successful textbook introduces students to economic fluctuations and their history.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapter 14. This ground-breaking textbook introduces recessions and financial crises and weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge.
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapter 24. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, contains a chapter on economic fluctuations. 
  • Macroeconomics by William Mitchell, L. Randall Wray, Martin Watts, from 2019, chapter 26. This ground-breaking and much-discussed textbook written by three leaders of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT), contains a useful chapter setting out different economic theories of crises.
  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016, chapters 12, 13, 14, & 16. This impressive and extensive book compares multiple perspectives on many traditional economic topics including business cycles.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapter 26. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on business cycles.
  • Alternative Ideas from 10 (Almost) Forgotten Economists by Irene van Staveren, from 2021, chapters 1-4. This book emphasizes often ignored and neglected ideas and contains chapters on the ideas of Minsky, Keynes, Marx and Knight on crises, debt, demand, capitalism, risk and uncertainty.
  • Post Keynesian theories of crisis by Steve Keen, from 2015. A useful article describing the two (complementary) theories, Minsky’s financial instability hypothesis and Godley’s stock-flow-consistent approach, that were used to predict and explain the financial crisis of 2007-8.
  • A Reformulation of Austrian Business Cycle Theory in Light of the Financial Crisis by Joseph T. Salerno, from 2011. Written in the aftermath of the financial crisis of 2007-8, this paper aims to revitalize the Austrian theory of business cycles by building on ideas of Mises, Hayke and Rothbard to explain the events of the last decades.

Books: 

  • Business Cycle Economics: Understanding Recessions and Depressions from Boom to Bust by Todd A. Knoop, from 2015. This book introduces students to what business cycles are and why they are relevant, the different theories that aim to explain them, the relationship with the financial sector, and the older and more recent history of crises. 
  • Modern Macroeconomics: Its Origins, Development and Current State by Brian Snowdon and Howard R. Vane, from 2005. This book sets out key macroeconomic ideas with chapters on Keynes and the classics, as well as the monetarist, new classical, new Keynesian, Post Keynesian, Austrian and public choice perspectives, and includes interviews with their key thinkers.

Chapters & Papers: 

  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 6. This brief and accessible pluralist book contains a useful introductory chapter on economic output and happiness.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 3. This well-written textbook sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on consumption.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapter 7. This successful and practical textbook introduces students to market demand and consumer behavior. 
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapter 9. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, contains a chapter devoted to consumption and the consumer society. 
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapter 15. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including a chapter on culture and consumption.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapter 13. This ground-breaking textbook weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge and contains a chapter on consumption.
  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016, chapter 3. This book discusses and compares the different theories and models that can be used to explain observed consumer behavior.
  • Veblen, Bourdieu, and Conspicuous Consumption by Andrew Trigg, from 2001. This article discusses the ideas on consumption coming from institutional economic and economic sociology.

Books: 

  • The Affluent Society by John Kenneth Galbraith, most recent edition from 1999. An influential book critically discussing what it means to live in an affluent society and the roles that consumption, advertising, and institutions have in it.
  • The Sociology of Consumption: An Introduction by Peter Corrigan, from 1997. This book introduces students to the vast literature on the social dynamics involving consumption with specific attention to topics such as shops, advertising, women’s magazines, the home, tourism, and fashion.
  • The Ecological Economics of Consumption by Lucia A. Reisch & Inge Røpke, from 2004. This book introduces students to the growing literature on the ecological aspects of consumption, looking at its environmental impact, needs and wants, lifestyles and daily routines, consumer policy and possibilities for more sustainable consumption patterns.
  • The Economics of Consumption: Theory and Evidence by Tullio Jappelli and Luigi Pistaferri, from 2017. This book describes different models of consumption, such as the precautionary saving and buffer stock models.

Chapters & Papers: 

  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapters 12 & 15. This well-written textbook which in two chapters set out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on economic growth, wellbeing and poverty.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapters 1, 2, 16 & 21. This successful textbook contains chapters on historical development, technology, and growth.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapters 5 & 15. This ground-breaking textbook weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge, and includes chapters on development and poverty.
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapter 32. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, contains a chapter on growth and development. 
  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016, chapters 12, 13, 14, & 16. This impressive and extensive book compares multiple perspectives on many traditional economic topics including business cycles.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapter 29. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on development.
  • Alternative Ideas from 10 (Almost) Forgotten Economists by Irene van Staveren, from 2021, chapter 7. This book emphasizes often ignored and neglected ideas and contains a chapter on the ideas of Amartya Sen on capabilities.
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapter 29. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including a chapter on the role of technology in the economy.
  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 11. This brief and accessible pluralist book contains a useful introductory chapter on poverty.
  • DPR Debate: Should industrial policy conform to comparative advantage or defy it? by Ha Joon Chang & Justin Lin, from 2009. A highly interesting written debate by two leading development economists enabling students to get a sharp and more nuanced understanding of a key debate surrounding policy.
  • Growth diagnostics by Ricardo Hausmann, Dani Rodrik, & Andrés Velasco, from 2004. A useful article bringing together many ideas about what is important for economic growth. 
  • Rethinking the Growth Diagnostics Approach: Questions from the Practitioners by Jesus Felipe and Norio Usui, from 2008. An interesting article critically discussing the growth diagnostics and its limitations. 

Books: 

  • Development: A Very Short Introduction by Ian Goldin, most recent edition from 2018. A brief but nevertheless insightful way to bring students in to the world of development, with attention to growth differences, aid, sustainability and globalization.
  • Handbook of alternative theories of economic development by E. Reinert, J. Ghosh, and R. Kattel, from 2016. An impressive collection of essays covering developmental ideas, histories, and issues from all over the world.
  • Beyond Growth: The Economics of Sustainable Development by Herman Daly, from 1996. A useful book written from an ecological perspective focusing on how economic development can become sustainable and move away from destructive growth.
  • Kicking Away the Ladder: Development Strategy in Historical Perspective by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2002. An influential and accessible book investigating how the developed countries became rich and how this differs from the stories we often tell about it.
  • Why Nations Fail by Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson, from 2012. A best-selling book building on new institutional insights on development, focusing on the distinction between inclusive and extractive institutions. 
  • New Structural Economics: A Framework for Rethinking Development and Policy by Justin Yifu Lin, from 2010. A useful collection of essays including reactions by prominent scholars introducing students to recent scientific and policy insights. 
  • Beyond Development: Alternative Visions from Latin America by M. Lang & D. Mokrani, from 2013. A collection of essays bringing together a diverse set of ideas and perspectives on development.
  • Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty by Abhijit V. Banerjee and Esther Duflo, from 2011. A popular book describing developmental literature using the randomized control trial approach. 
  • What Works in Development? Thinking Big and Thinking Small by Jessica Cohen and William Easterly, from 2009. A daring collection of essays aiming to arrive at a consensus with a broad collection of mainstream scholars on which approach is most effective, asking the question whether we should focus on thinking big by looking at institutions, macro policies, and growth or rather thinking small by relying on micro interventions?
  • Economic Growth And Development by Hendrik Van den Berg, from 2012. A useful book bringing history, normative debates, and a wide range of theoretical approaches and topics. 
  • Development Economics: Theory, Empirical Research, and Policy Analysis by Julie Schaffner, from 2013. This book provides a wide overview of the various aspects of development and brings in insights from increasingly popular approaches, such as behavioral economics and new institutional economics. 
  • Development Macroeconomics: Alternative Strategies for Growth by Basil Oberholzer, from 2020. This book aims to help identify effective macroeconomic strategies for growth by taking into account the multiple constraints that countries face.
  • Socio-Economic Development by Adam Szirmai, from 2015. An impressive book dealing with a vast array of topics and ideas related to economic development in a systematic manner. 

Chapters & Papers: 

  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 8. This brief and accessible pluralist book contains a useful introductory chapter on finance.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 9. This well-written textbook sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on finance.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapter 14. This ground-breaking textbook introduces recessions and financial crises and weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapter 17. This successful textbook devotes one chapter to helping students better understand the Great Depression, the Golden Age of Capitalism, and the Global Financial Crisis. 
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapter 30. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, contains one chapter on the financial crisis. 
  • Macroeconomics by William Mitchell, L. Randall Wray, Martin Watts, from 2019, chapter 10. This ground-breaking and much-discussed textbook written by three leaders of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT), introduces students to how money and banking work.
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapter 13. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including a chapter on banking and financial markets.
  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016, chapter 10. This impressive and extensive book compares multiple perspectives on many traditional economic topics including finance and interest rates.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapters 17, 18, 19 & 28. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on money, monetary regimes, banks in developing countries, shadow banking, and financialization.
  • Alternative Ideas from 10 (Almost) Forgotten Economists by Irene van Staveren, from 2021, chapters 1-4. This book emphasizes often ignored and neglected ideas and contains chapters on the ideas of Minsky, Keynes, Marx and Knight on crises, debt, demand, capitalism, risk and uncertainty.
  • “No one saw this coming”: Understanding Financial Crisis Through Accounting Models by Dirk Bezemer, from 2009. An insightful article introducing students to the post-Keynesian models used to predict and understand the financial crisis of 2007-8.
  • Complexity Economics as Heterodoxy: Theory and Policy by Wolfram Elsner, from 2017. A brief article that helps students understand the complexity approach to economic theory and policy. 
  • The anthropology of money by Bill Maurer, from 2006. This review article introduces students to the anthropological and cultural literature on finance and money.

Books: 

  • The Routledge International Handbook of Financialization by Philip Mader, Daniel Mertens, and Natascha van der Zwan, from 2020. An impressive collection of essays that summarizes the vast literature on the increasing role of finance in the economy.
  • Principles of Sustainable Finance by Dirk Schoenmaker and Willem Schramade, from 2018. This useful book looks at finance in relation to environmental challenges and helps students understand how it can promote rather than counter sustainability. 
  • An Engine, Not a Camera: How Financial Models Shape Markets by Donald MacKenzie, from 2006. This book introduces students to performativity theory and its understanding of finance.
  • The End of Alchemy: Money, Banking and the Future of the Global Economy by Mervyn King, from 2016. Written by the Governor of the Bank of England during the financial crisis, this book gives students an insider as well as critical view of the financial world. 
  • Between Debt and the Devil: Money, Credit, and Fixing Global Finance by Adair Turner, from 2015. Another highly influential policy economist reflecting on how finance is organized and how this could be improved.
  • The Deficit Myth: Modern Monetary Theory and the Birth of the People’s Economy by Stephanie Kelton, from 2020. This influential bestseller sets out the core ideas of Modern Monetary Theory in an accessible manner and argues for changing how we think about and do monetary and fiscal policy.
  • Behavioral Finance: Psychology, Decision-Making, and Markets by Lucy Ackert & Richard Deaves, from 2009. This book introduces behavioral economics and its approach to finance.
  • Liquidated: An Ethnography of Wall Street by Karen Ho, from 2009. A highly influential anthropological study of finance and its wider impact on the economy. 

Chapters & Papers: 

  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 7. This brief and accessible pluralist book contains a useful introductory chapter on the world of production.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 4. This well-written textbook sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on the firm and management.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapter 6. This successful textbook introduces students to the economics of the firm with attention to the division of labour as well as the labour discipline model and agency theory. 
  • The Microeconomics of Complex Economies: Evolutionary, Institutional, Neoclassical and Complexity Perspectives by Wolfram Elsner, Torsten Heinrich, and Henning Schwardt, from 2014, chapter 16. This innovative textbook makes readers familiar with new insights coming from frontier mainstream economic research, with one chapter devoted to firms, networks and innovation.
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapters 19-21. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including three chapters on the role of firms, business groups, and entrepreneurship in the economy.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapter 10. This ground-breaking textbook introduces firms and industries and weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge.
  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016, 4 & 6. This impressive and extensive book compares multiple perspectives on many traditional economic topics including production, costs, prices, capital and profit.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapter 14. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on the business enterprise.
  • What is a firm? A historical perspective by Alfred Chandler, from 1992. A useful short article which introduces students to the influential research and ideas of Chandler on how firms and management work and shape the modern economy. 
  • How do UK companies set prices? by Hall, Simon, Mark Walsh, and Anthony Yates, from 1997. An informative study that empirically investigates, rather than assumes, how firms set prices by analyzing the behaviour of 654 UK firms.
  • Towards a political theory of the firm by Luigi Zingales, from 2017. A useful paper enabling students to better understand how political and economic processes overlap and interact, in particular how the political power and profits of firms can reinforce each other.

Books: 

  • Handbook on the Economics and Theory of the Firm by Michael Dietrich and Jackie Krafft, from 2012. This impressive collection of essays introduces students to the wide variety of ideas on the firm, from Marshall and new institutional economics to Schumpeter and the resource-based view.
  • The Theory of the Firm: An Overview of the Economic Mainstream by Paul Walker, from 2016. This book introduces students to the classical, neoclassical, and new institutional perspectives on the firm.
  • Theory of the Firm: Governance, Residual Claims, and Organizational Forms by Michael C. Jensen, from 2000. This book introduces students to the agency and shareholder theory of the firm, arguing that firms should exclusively focus on maximizing shareholder value in order to prevent inefficiencies. 
  • The Transformation of Corporate Control by Neil Fligstein, from 1993. An influential book examining changes in how US firms were run throughout the 20th century as a result of its interaction with the wider society and how control shifted from manufacturing to sales and marketing to finance.
  • Predatory Value Extraction by William Lazonick and Jang-Sup Shin, from 2019. This informative book builds on the resource view and helps students understand how firms can engage in value creation and innovation, but also value extraction and rent-seeking.
  • The Problem of Production: A New Theory of the Firm by Per L. Bylund, from 2015. This book introduces students to the Austrian theory of the firm, which is viewed as a part of the market, not standing outside of it, and putting the emphasis on entrepreneurship and information.

Chapters & Papers: 

  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 2. This well-written textbook which in one chapter sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on households.
  • Alternative Ideas from 10 (Almost) Forgotten Economists by Irene van Staveren, from 2021, chapter 5. This book emphasizes often ignored and neglected ideas and contains a chapter on the ideas of Barbara Bergmann on gender biases.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapter 13. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on households.
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapter 27. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including a chapter on the role of gender in the economy.
  • Gender ideology: Components, predictors, and consequences by Shannon N​. Davis and Theodore N. Greenstein, from 2009. This review article discusses the literature on how ideas about gender come about and how influence people’s choices in the household and labour market. 
  • “Never Intended to be a Theory of Everything”: Domestic Labor in Neoclassical and Marxian Economics by Therese Jefferson & John E. King, from 2001. This article summarizes the history of how unpaid housework was, and was not, treated in neoclassical and Marxian economics. 
  • Unpaid Care Work: The missing link in the analysis of gender gaps in labour outcomes by Gaëlle Ferrant, Luca Maria Pesando and Keiko Nowacka, from 2014. This OECD paper discusses how gender differences in unpaid care work helps explain gender gaps in labour force participation, wages and job quality.

Books: 

  • Sociology of Families: Change, Continuity, and Diversity by Teresa Ciabattari, from 2016. This useful textbook introduces students to the vast sociological literature on families, with its different theories and aspects. 
  • If Women Counted by Marilyn Waring, from 1988. This book is often regarded as a founding document of feminist economics as it drew attention to the ways in which unpaid labour and nature were generally ignored in economics and national accounts. 
  • A Treatise on the Family by Gary Becker, from 1981. This influential book describes the neoclassical approach to households and gender differences. 
  • Beyond Economic Man: Feminist Theory and Economics by Marianne A. Ferber and Julie A. Nelson, from 1993. This influential book introduces students the key ideas in feminist economics as well as describing its varieties. 
  • Economics of Women, Men and Work by Francine D Blau, Marianne A. Ferber, & Anne E. Winkler, most recent edition from 2013. This textbook introduces students to mainstream and neoclassical ideas and research on households and gender differences. 
  • For the Family? How Class and Gender Shape Women’s Work by Sarah Damaske, from 2011. This book applies an intersectional approach to households by looking at how gender and class interact with each other and help explain observed patterns in behavior. 
  • The Oxford Handbook of Women and the Economy by Susan L. Averett, Laura M. Argys, and Saul D. Hoffman, from 2018. This impressive collection of essays covers many of the different aspects of the role of gender in the economy and focuses in particular on marriage, fertility and the labour market.

Chapters & Papers: 

  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 9. This brief and accessible pluralist book contains a useful introductory chapter on inequality and poverty.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 15. This well-written textbook which in one chapter sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on wellbeing, poverty and wealth inequality.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapter 19. This successful textbook introduces students to economic inequality and key econometric findings about it.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapters 4 & 5. This ground-breaking textbook introduces inequality and power and weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge.
  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016, chapter 17. This impressive and extensive book compares multiple perspectives on many traditional economic topics and includes a chapter discussing complexity economics’ and Piketty’s insights on inequality as well as global inequality and underdevelopment.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapters 9 & 21. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on distribution, inequality and poverty.
  • Alternative Ideas from 10 (Almost) Forgotten Economists by Irene van Staveren, from 2021, chapter 6. This book emphasizes often ignored and neglected ideas and contains a chapter on the ideas of Veblen, the founder of institutional economics, on inequality.
  • Neoclassical economists’ theories of discrimination by Paula England, from 1994. This chapter sets out the various neoclassical models of discrimination.
  • Gender: An intersectionality perspective by Stephanie A. Shields, from 2008. This paper provides a brief introduction into intersectionality and focuses in more detail on empirical research on gender.
  • Toward a field of intersectionality studies: Theory, applications, and praxis by Sumi Cho, Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, and Leslie McCall, from 2013. This article provides an overview of the various interpretations and applications of the concept of intersectionality.
  • Colloquium: Statistical mechanics of money, wealth, and income by Victor Yakovenko and Barkley Rosser, from 2009. This review article provides an overview of the econophysics and complexity economics literature on inequality and their key findings relating to exponential and power-law probability distributions.
  • A behavioral-economics view of poverty by Marianne Bertrand, Sendhil Mullainathan, Eldar Shafir, from 2004. This article sets out a behavioral approach to poverty by recognizing the importance of human cognitive limitations and contrasts this view with the ideas of the “culture of poverty” and hyperrationality.
  • Poverty impedes cognitive function by Anandi Mani, Sendhil Mullainathan, Eldar Shafir, & Jiaying Zhao, from 2013. This influential behavioral economic article investigates the effects that poverty has on cognitive and mental processes. 
  • The enemy between us: The psychological and social costs of inequality by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett, from 2017. This influential study provides a useful overview of the various consequences of inequality, such as its impact on status anxiety, depression, narcissism, social cohesion, advertisement, and drugs, alcohol, food, gambling and shopping addictions.
  • Sociological Perspectives on Racial Discrimination by Mario L. Small and Devah Pager, from 2020. This article summarizes the sociological literature and research on racial discrimination for economists and emphasizes the importance of institutions in explaining and understanding observed patterns.

Books: 

  • The Economics of Inequality, Discrimination, Poverty, and Mobility by Robert Rycroft, from 2009. This book introduces students to the various economic aspects of inequality, helping them better understand its causes, mechanisms and consequences.
  • Capital in the Twenty-First Century by Thomas Piketty, from 2014. A uniquely influential book on economic equality, looking at the issue from a long run and econometric perspective. 
  • After Piketty: The Agenda for Economics and Inequality by Heather Boushey, J. Bradford DeLong, & Marshall Steinbaum, from 2017. This collection of essays explores how the field of economic inequality should develop, drawing attention to issues such as modeling inequality, measuring wealth inequality, the causes of inequality, policy solutions, and interdisciplinarity.  
  • Anti-Piketty: Capital for the 21st Century by Jean-Philippe Delsol, Emmanuel Martin, & Nicolas Lecaussin, from 2017. This collection of essays from the libertarian think tank the Cato Institute, pushes against Piketty’s ideas by arguing inequality has not grown, the rich are not rentiers and that taxation is the problem, not the solution.
  • Global Inequality: A New Approach for the Age of Globalization by Branko Milanovic, from 2016. This book, written by the maker of the famous elephant curve of global inequality, helps students understand how inequality has developed both within and among countries, how it relates to globalization and what policies might be effective.
  • The Rise and Decline of Patriarchal Systems: An Intersectional Political Economy by Nancy Folbre, from 2019. This book, written by a prominent feminist economist, how gender has and still shapes economies and how it (under)values care work.
  • Intersectionality by Patricia Hill Collins and Sirma Bilge, from 2020. This book introduces students to the concept and history of intersectionality as well as its application to topics such as education, economic policy and globalization.
  • The Code of Capital: How the Law Creates Wealth and Inequality by Katharina Pistor, from 2019. This influential book draws attention to the role of law in the economy and gives insight into how it shapes and impacts inequality. 
  • The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Almost Always Do Better by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett, from 2009. A best seller written by two epidemiologists investigating the relation between inequality and social cohesion, health, education, violence, crime and social mobility. 
  • The New Economics of Inequality and Redistribution by Samuel Bowles, Christina M. Fong, Herbert Gintis, & Ugo Pagano, from 2012. This book proposes a new approach to inequality drawing on recent insights on wealth inequality, behavioral economics and the negative consequences of inequality.
  • Econophysics of income and wealth distributions by Bikas K. Chakrabarti, Anirban Chakraborti, Satya R. Chakravarty, Arnab Chatterjee, from 2013. This book sets out research and models on inequality developed by econophysists and complexity economists.

Chapters & Papers: 

  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 12. This brief and accessible pluralist book contains a useful introductory chapter on international economics.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 14. This well-written textbook which in one chapter sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on international trade.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapter 18. This successful textbook introduces students to the economics of globalization, trade and inequality.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapter 16. This ground-breaking textbook introduces trade, exchange rates and the balance of payments and weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge.
  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016, chapter 11. This impressive and extensive book compares multiple perspectives on many traditional economic topics and includes a chapter on international trade and exchange rates.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapters 23, 24 & 29. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on trade, global value chains and international development.
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapters 8 & 9. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including two chapters on international institutions, organizations and arrangements.
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapters 7 & 29. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, contains two chapters on international trade, finance and policy. 
  • Macroeconomics by William Mitchell, L. Randall Wray, Martin Watts, from 2019, chapter 24. This ground-breaking and much-discussed textbook written by three leaders of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT), contains a useful chapter setting out the economics of exchange rates, balance of payments and international competitiveness.
  • Foundations of Real-World Economics by John Komlos, from 2019, chapter 13. This critical introduction to economics contains one chapter on international trade and infant industries.
  • Absolute advantage and international trade: Evidence from four Euro-zone economies by Stergios A. Seretis and Persefoni V. Tsaliki, from 2016. This paper investigates international trade in the eurozone and concludes it is persistent productivity differences and not comparative advantages that can explain observed patterns.
  • The US-China trade balance and the theory of free trade: Debunking the currency manipulation argument by Isabella Weber and Anwar Shaikh, from 2020. This article describes the debates in empirical literature on the exchange rate of China and argues the findings can be explained by applying the absolute cost theory. 

Books: 

  • International Political Economy: Interests and Institutions in the Global Economy by Thomas H. Oatley, most recent edition from 2019. This book introduces students to the political economy of international trade and finance, with state- and society-centred approaches. 
  • International Economics: A Heterodox Approach by Hendrik van den Berg, most recent edition from 2017. This book introduces international economics from a heterodox perspective, covering trade theory, policy, international finance and monetary systems, and immigration.
  • The Globalization Paradox by Dani Rodrik, from 2011. An insightful discussion of globalization and exposition of the international political trilemma, written by a highly influential economist. 
  • Straight Talk on Trade: Ideas for a Sane World Economy by Dani Rodrik, from 2017. This book discusses various issues related to trade and globalization and argues for a pluralist world in which countries can have their own social contracts. 
  • Globalization and Its Discontents Revisited by Joseph Stiglitz, from 2017. This update of an earlier bestseller discusses globalization, its mismanagement, and what policies to tackle today’s problems. 

Chapters & Papers: 

  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 10. This brief and accessible pluralist book contains a useful introductory chapter on work and unemployment.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 8. This well-written textbook which in one chapter sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on labour markets.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapters 3, 9, 14 & 16. This successful textbook introduces students to economics of work, labour markets, unemployment and technological change.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapters 6 & 7. This ground-breaking textbook introduces work and unemployment and weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge.
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapter 10. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, contains a chapter on labour markets. 
  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016, chapters 4, 6 & 14. This impressive and extensive book compares multiple perspectives on many traditional economic topics including production, wages and unemployment.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapters 25 & 35. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on labour processes and full employment.
  • Alternative Ideas from 10 (Almost) Forgotten Economists by Irene van Staveren, from 2021, chapter 5. This book emphasizes often ignored and neglected ideas and contains chapters on the ideas of Barbara Bergmann on gender biases.
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapters 12, 14, 17 and 25. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including four chapters on labour markets and trade unions, work and occupations, networks, and education.
  • Job Search and Network Composition: Implications of the Strength-of-Weak-Ties Hypothesis by James Montgomery, from 1992. An influential paper in social network analysis on the importance of ‘weak ties for finding a job and the level of the wage. 

Books: 

  • Labour: A Heterodox Approach by Jean Vercherand, from 2014. This short book introduces students to the economics of labour in a pluralist and historically grounded way, paying attention to classical, neoclassical, Keynesian, Marxian and Schumpeterian theories and ideas.
  • Economics of Imperfect Labor Markets by Tito Boeri and Jan van Ours, from 2013. This advanced textbook focuses on the economics of labour market institutions, such as minimum wages, unemployment policies, employment regulation, family policies, wage negotiations, pensions, education and migration policy.
  • The Sociology of Work: Introduction by Keith Grint, from 1991. This book provides a broad introduction of work by discussing its history, different classical and contemporary theories, industrial relations, gender, race/ethnicity, technology and globalization. 
  • The Sociology of Work: Continuity and Change in Paid and Unpaid Work by Stephen Edgell, from 2005. Another, but more recent, introduction into work, focusing on de- and upskilling, alienation, fordism, unemployment, globalization, and industrial, service, domestic, non-standard and home work.
  • Paid and Unpaid Labour in the Social Economy: An International Perspective by Sergio Destefanis and Marco Musella, from 2009. This book introduces students to the different ways in which work can be organized, whether it is through nonprofit organizations, voluntary associations, households, cooperatives or social enterprises. 
  • Getting A Job by M. Granovetter, from 1974. A classic in social network analysis introducing readers to the importance of personal relations in understanding labour market outcomes. 
  • The sociology of labour markets by Ralph Fevre, from 1992. This book introduces students to the sociology of labour markets and how it relates to the economics of labour markets, paying particular attention to institutions, social relations, values, and the state.  
  • Sourcebook of labor markets: Evolving structures and processes by Ivar Berg and Arne L. Kalleberg, from 2001. This collection of essays explores how labour markets have evolved, focusing on changing institutional structures, employment relations, inequality and discrimination.
  • The Oxford Handbook of Women and the Economy by Susan L. Averett, Laura M. Argys, and Saul D. Hoffman, from 2018. One-third of this collection of essays is devoted to the role and position of women in the labour market, including chapters on the gender wage gap, labour force participation, racial differences, taxes, and the feminist perspective.  
  • Handbook of Labor Economics by Orley Ashenfelter & David Card, most recent edition from 2010. A collection of essays on recent research on labour markets, focusing on racial and gender inequality, human capital development and intergenerational mobility, institutional reforms and imperfect competition, and lifecycle choices and expectations. 

Chapters & Papers: 

  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 5. This well-written textbook which in one chapter sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on markets.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapters 8, 11 & 12. This successful textbook introduces students to the economics of market competition, rent-seeking, and market failures.
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapters 17 & 18. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, contains two chapters on markets with and without power. 
  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016, chapters 7, 8 & 9. This impressive and extensive book compares theories and empirics on many traditional economic topics including competition and prices.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapters 25 & 35. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on labour processes and full employment.
  • Alternative Ideas from 10 (Almost) Forgotten Economists by Irene van Staveren, from 2021, chapter 9. This book emphasizes often ignored and neglected ideas and contains chapters on the ideas of Adam Smith on the abuse of markets.
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapter 11. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including a chapter on markets.
  • The Microeconomics of Complex Economies: Evolutionary, Institutional, Neoclassical and Complexity Perspectives by Wolfram Elsner, Torsten Heinrich, and Henning Schwardt, from 2014, chapters 5-7. This innovative textbook makes readers familiar with new insights coming from frontier mainstream economic research, with three chapters devoted to the neoclassical theory of markets as well as critiques and how the real world deviates from it.
  • Classical vs. Neoclassical Conceptions of Competition by Lefteris Tsoulfidis, from 2011. A useful article introducing students to the two main opposing perspectives on markets: the dynamic process view and static equilibrium view. 
  • Varieties of Field Theory by Daniel Kluttz and Neil Fligstein, from 2016. This chapter introduces students to field theory and its understanding of markets by providing an overview of its different strands.
  • Markets as Politics: A Political-Cultural Approach to Market Institutions by Neil Fligstein, from 1996. This influential article sets out core ideas of the field theoretic approach to markets. 
  • Irrational behavior and economic theory by Gary Becker, from 1962. In this classic article, Becker, a key prominent of neoclassical economics, shows how many key empirical microeconomic patterns derived without assuming rational utility maximization.
  • Toward a positive theory of consumer choice by Richard Thaler, from 1980. In this influential article, Thaler, a leading behavioural economist, argues we should understand neoclassical theory as being normative, describing how people should behave, and behavioural economics as providing a descriptive theory of how people actually do behave. 

Books: 

  • The architecture of markets: An economic sociology of twenty-first-century capitalist societies by Neil Fligstein, from 2001. This book introduces students to the field theoretic approach to markets, paying particular attention to institutions, employment systems, corporate governance and globalization.  
  • The Social Structures of the Economy by Pierre Bourdieu, from 2000. This book presents an extensive and detailed analysis of the French housing market followed by a short introduction into the field theoretic approach to studying markets. 
  • The Great Transformation by Karl Polanyi, from 1944. This classic describes the history of markets and its social embeddedness. 
  • Do Economists Make Markets? On the Performativity of Economics by Donald MacKenzie, Fabian Muniesa and Lucia Siu, from 2008. This influential collection of essays gives an introduction and overview of the literature on performativity and analyzing markets through a cultural lens. 
  • Economic Lives: How Culture Shapes the Economy by Viviana Zelizar, from 2010. This book brings together the literature using a cultural approach to understand the economy and markets, discussing issues related to pricing, money, intimacy, care and commerce.

Chapters & Papers: 

  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016, chapters 5 & 15. This impressive and extensive book compares multiple perspectives on many traditional economic topics including money, prices and inflation.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapter 8. This ground-breaking textbook introduces money and weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 11. This well-written textbook sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on money.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapters 10 & 15. This successful textbook provides an introduction into mainstream ideas and empirical findings on money, credit, inflation and monetary policy. 
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapters 26 & 27. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, devotes two chapters to money, banking and monetary policy.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapters 5, 7, 17, 18 & 19. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on monetary theories, value, money, and banking.
  • Macroeconomics by William Mitchell, L. Randall Wray, Martin Watts, from 2019, chapters 9 & 10. This ground-breaking and much-discussed textbook written by three leaders of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT), introduces students to the different theories of money and currencies.
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapter 16. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including a chapter on the sociology of money and credit.
  • Money Creation in the Modern Economy by Michael McLeay, Amar Radia and Ryland Thomas, from 2014. This article, by the Bank of England, helps students understand how money is created and debunks some popular misconceptions.

Books: 

  • Where Does Money Come From? by Josh Ryan-Collins, Tony Greenham, Richard Werner, and Andrew Jackson, from 2011. This accessible book introduces students to different ideas about money and helps students understand recent developments and the technical workings of the monetary system.
  • A Handbook of Alternative Monetary Economics by Philip Arestis and Malcolm Sawyer, from 2006. This useful collection of essays introduces students to various different monetary theories, from Marx and Keynes their theories of money and credit to Minsky’s financial instability hypothesis and theories about the endogeneity of money.
  • The Social Life of Money by Nigel Dodd, from 2014. This accessible book, written by a leading sociologist, introduces students to the origins of money, its relation to capital and debt, and a variety of ideas on the social, cultural and political dynamics related to money. 
  • The Social Meaning of Money by Viviana Zelizer, from 1994. This influential book looks at money from a cultural lens, showing how people earmark money and how meaning making processes shape monetary behaviour. 
  • Debt: The First 5000 Years by David Graeber, from 2011. This bestseller explores the history and anthropology of money and debt, emphasizing its interaction with broader social institutions.
  • Money and Government: A Challenge to Mainstream Economics by Robert Skidelsky, from 2019. This useful book introduces students to the key ideas throughout history up to today on macroeconomics, money and the government.
  • The Nature of Money by Geoffrey Ingham, from 2004. This book provides an overview of different theories about the fundamental nature and working of money and credit in the economy. 
  • Concepts of Money by Geoffrey Ingham, from 2005. This book is a collection of classic essays on money and includes chapters by Austrian, Marxian, Keynesian and cultural economists and scholars. 
  • Money (The Art of Living) by Eric Lonergan, from 2009. This accessible book, written by a hedge fund manager, helps students what money is and how it functions in today’s economy.
  • The Economics of Central Banking by Livio Stracca, from 2018. This book introduces students to how central banking works and discusses key questions and debates related to the dominant mainstream models, the zero lower bound, financial stability, globalization and digitalization.
  • Marxist Monetary Theory: Collected Papers by Costas Lapavitsas, from 2016. This book introduces students to Marxian thinking about money and monetary policy.
  • Monetary Economics: An Integrated Approach to Credit, Money, Income, Production and Wealth by Wynne Godley and Marc Lavoie, from 2006. This book, written by two key post Keynesian economists, introduces students to different theories and models of money and monetary dynamics.

Chapters & Papers: 

  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 13 This well-written textbook sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on nature.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapter 3. This ground-breaking textbook introduces the environment, resources and sustainability and weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapter 20. This successful textbook provides an introduction into economics of the environment. 
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapters 13, 21, and 33. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, devotes three chapters to the environment, broader measurement, and sustainability. 
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapters 16, 30 & 31. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on nature, energy and the environment.
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapter 30. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including a chapter on the economy and the environment.
  • Polycentric systems for coping with collective action and global environmental change by Elinor Ostrom, from 2010. This article, written from an institutional perspective, argues for tackling climate change on multiple scales and levels, rather than focusing only on global efforts, as this can prevent inaction and allow for more experimentation and learning. 
  • A review on circular economy: the expected transition to a balanced interplay of environmental and economic systems by Patrizia Ghisellini, Catia Cialani, and S. Ulgiati, from 2016. This article provides an overview of the literature on the circular economy.

Books: 

  • Rethinking the Economics of Land and Housing by Josh Ryan-Collins, Toby Lloyd, and Laurie Macfarlane, from 2017. This accessible book introduces students to classical and modern theories of land and housing, including concepts as economic rent and financialization. 
  • Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: A Contemporary Approach by Jonathan M Harris & Brian Roach, from 2002. This textbook introduces students to the neoclassical and ecological approaches to nature and environmental issues. 
  • Ecological Economics: Principles And Applications by Herman E. Daly and Joshua Farley, from 2003. This textbook introduces students to ecological economics and the economics of nature and resources.
  • Dimensions of Environmental and Ecological Economics by Nirmal Chandra Sahu and Amita Kumari Choudhury, from 2005. This collection of essays provides an overview of the neoclassical and ecological theories of nature and the economy. 
  • Routledge Handbook of Ecological Economics: Nature and Society by Clive L. Spash, from 2017. This collection of essays introduces students to variety of theoretical approaches to nature and the economy, from ecological and neoclassical economics, to institutional, feminist, Marxian, post Keynesian and evolutionary economics. 

Adapting Existing Courses

A range of analytical tools and approaches

  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapters 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. This textbook discusses the topics of households, consumption, firms and markets from the neoclassical, institutional, social and post-Keynesian perspectives.
  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 6, 7 and 9. This book provides a pluralist and accessible introduction into, among others, different economic approaches, the world of production, happiness and inequality.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapters 4, 9, 10, and 13. This textbook introduces the topics of economic value, markets, firms, consumption, and power from the post-Keynesian, Austrian, Marxian, and neoclassical perspectives.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapters 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 11, 12, and 19. This textbook discusses many microeconomic topics, such as supply and demand, the firm, social interactions, power and inequality, while including recent mainstream insights and empirical findings.
  • The Microeconomics of Complex Economies: Evolutionary, Institutional, Neoclassical and Complexity Perspectives by Wolfram Elsner, Torsten Heinrich, and Henning Schwardt, from 2014, chapter 17. This innovative textbook makes readers familiar with new insights coming from frontier mainstream economic research, with particular attention to game theory, agent-based modelling, system dynamics, and empirical realities.
  • Rethinking Economics: An Introduction to Pluralist Economics by Liliann Fischer, Joe Hasell, J. Christopher Proctor, David Uwakwe, Zach Ward Perkins, Catriona Watson, from 2017. This collection of essays provides an accessible introduction into post-Keynesian, Marxian, Austrian, institutional, feminist, behavioural, complexity and ecological economics.
  • Real World Micro, by Dollars & Sense, most recent edition from 2020. This collection of essays explores the empirical reality of many microeconomic topics, such as the minimum wage, trade policy, and stock markets.
  • Towards a political theory of the firm, by Luigi Zingales, from 2017. In this paper Zingales argues for paying more attention to the role of power in firms as well as providing a brief history of different theories of the firm.
  • Firms as political entities by Isabelle Ferreras, from 2017. A provocative book on the economic history and theories of the firm, arguing for a reappreciation of the role of power in the firm.
  • An Evolutionary Alternative to Mainstream Microeconomics by Joseph E. Pluta, from 2015. A critical book proposing a more dynamic approach to the microeconomics of firms and markets building on behavioural, institutional as well as evolutionary insights as the title suggests.
  • Classical vs. Neoclassical Conceptions of Competition by Lefteris Tsoulfidis, 2011. This paper juxtaposes the static and dynamic views of competition, respectively held by neoclassical economists on the one hand, and classical, Marxian, Austrian economists and business scholars on the other hand.
  • Rethinking Microeconomics: A Proposed Reconstruction by Anwar Shaikh, from 2012. Shaikh argues microeconomics education could be more robust, rigorous and empirically grounded, building on old and new insights, in particular concerning emergent properties and shaping structures. Interestingly, he also builds on the insight of Becker (1962, “Irrational Behavior and Economic Theory.” Journal of Political Economy) that the key empirical consumption patterns, such as downward sloping demand curves, Engel’s Law, and Keynesian type consumption functions, can be derived without assuming rational utility maximisation and only requires two assumptions: that there is a budget constraint and a minimum level of consumption for necessary goods. His book Capitalism can also be useful for teaching.

Institutions and different ways of organising the economy

  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Molly S. Cato, Maria A. C. Madi, from 2018, chapters 10, 11 & 12. Three accessible and brief chapters, with accompanying classroom activities and questions, introducing students to what public goods, commons and firms are and how they can be governed, for example as a corporation owned by shareholders or as a cooperative owned by its workers or consumers.
  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 5. A short well-written chapter on different economic actors and organisational forms, from multinational corporations, cooperatives, and labour unions, to governments and a variety of international organisations.
  • Organisations: A Very Short Introduction by Mary Jo Hatch, from 2011. A brief, accessible and yet highly informative book full with scientific theories and ideas on what organisations are, how they can be structured, how they change, and their internal dynamics and interaction with markets and society.
  • Governing the Commons: The Evolution of Institutions for Collective Action by Elinor Ostrom, most recent edition from 2015, chapters 1, 2 & 3. A sharp and rigorous discussion of commons, how they are different from markets and hierarchies, how we should theorize them and real-world examples that help us better understand how they can be successful.
  • Contemporary Capitalism: The Embeddedness of Institutions by J. Rogers Hollingsworth and Robert Boyer, most recent edition from 2012, chapter 1. An instructive analytical introduction and overview of different coordination and allocation mechanisms, such as markets, public and private hierarchies, networks, communities and associations.

Societal relevance and normative aspects

  • Economic Analysis, Moral Philosophy, and Public Policy by Daniel Hausman, Michael McPherson, and Debra Satz, most recent edition from 2016. A great introduction into normative economics, covering its many areas and topics from welfare economics and utility theory to liberty, equality and justice.
  • A Guide to Ethics and Public Policy: Finding Our Way by D. Don Welch, from 2014. A brief but insightful book providing a broad framework for evaluating policy proposals and outcomes, organised around five moral principles: benefit, effectiveness, fairness, fidelity, and legitimacy.
  • Political Ideologies: An Introduction by Andrew Heywood, most recent edition from 2021. A useful and accessible introduction into a wide variety of political ideologies, from liberalism, socialism, and conservatism to feminism, nationalism, and green ideology, that shape much of our normative thinking on the economy.
  • Moral Views on Market Society by Marion Fourcade and Kieran Healy, from 2007. An insightful overview paper on the key different normative perspectives on capitalism, enabling readers to better understand and place ideas and arguments prevalent in many debates about the economy.
  • What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets by Michael J. Sandel, most recent edition from 2012. A highly influential and well-written book reflecting on the moral place of markets in society and asking the key question whether everything should be up for sale. The Institute for New Economic Thinking has also launched a video series on the book and topic.

History

  • The Worldly Philosophers: The Lives, Times and Ideas of the Great Economic Thinkers by Robert Heilbroner, most recent edition from 1999. While first published in 1953, it remains perhaps the best introduction into the history of economic thought to this day. In a remarkably well-written and accessible manner it discusses the ideas of key economists and puts them into historical context.
  • Grand Pursuit: The Story of Economic Genius by Sylvia Naser, from 2012. Another very accessible but more recent book introducing the history of economic thought through captivating narratives.
  • A Companion to the History of Economic Thought by Warren J. Samuels, Jeff E. Biddle, and John B. Davis, from 2003, chapter 24 & 25. An extensive and detailed collection of contributions covering many periods and developments in the history of economic thought, with two chapters specifically devoted to the history of post-war neoclassical microeconomics and formalist revolution in economics.
  • The Great Transformation: The Political and Economic Origins of Our Time by Karl Polanyi, most recent edition from 2001. This classic explores the economic history of the rise and fall of the market economy and how this transformed society.

A range of analytical tools and approaches

  • Macroeconomics in Context by Neva Goodwin, Jonathan M. Harris, Julie A. Nelson, Pratistha Joshi Rajkarnikar, Brian Roach, and Mariano Torras, most recent edition from 2019. A useful textbook that treats much of the traditional content, but pays considerably more attention to questions related to financial crises, social inequality and environmental sustainability.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapters 6, 7, 10, and 12. This textbook discusses the topics of the state, public goods, macroeconomic flows, and economic growth from the neoclassical, institutional, social and post-Keynesian perspectives.
  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 6, 10 and 11. This book provides a pluralist and accessible introduction into, among others, different economic approaches, the world of output, unemployment and the state.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapters 7, 12, 13 and 14. This textbook introduces the topics of unemployment, investment, financial crises, and fiscal and monetary policy, from the post-Keynesian, Austrian, Marxian, and neoclassical perspectives.
  • Real World Macro, by Dollars & Sense, most recent edition from 2020. This collection of essays explores the empirical reality of many macroeconomic topics, such as unemployment, inequality, inflation, monetary and fiscal policy.
  • Macroeconomics by William Mitchell, L. Randall Wray, Martin Watts, from 2019, chapters 20, 21, 22 and 23. This ground-breaking and much-discussed textbook written by three leaders of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT), describes in detail the history of economic thinking about the state and macroeconomy as well as recent theoretical and policy debates.
  • Money and Government: The Past and Future of Economics by Robert Skidelsky, from 2018. This well-written and insightful book introduces readers to historical and current debates about the macro economy, with particular attention to neoclassical and Keynesian ideas.
  • The Undercover Economist Strikes Back: How to Run or Ruin an Economy by Tim Harford, from 2013. An accessible and well-written introduction into macroeconomics, discussing various topics from dealing with recessions, unemployment and inflation, striving for (GNP) growth, happiness, sustainability and more equality.

Institutions and different ways of organising the economy

  • Capitalism by Geoffrey Ingham, from 2008. A highly insightful introduction into capitalism with chapters on key ideas from Smith, Marx, Weber, Schumpeter and Keynes, and core institutions, such as market exchange, the enterprise, money, capital, financial markets and the state.
  • Capitalism: A Very Short Introduction by James Fulcher, most recent edition from 2015. A brief and yet useful book on capitalism’s definition, historical evolution, varieties, global networks, and recurring crises.
  • Comparative economics in a transforming world economy by J. Barkley Rosser, Jr. and Marina V. Rosser, most recent edition from 2018. A highly useful and broad book describing many varieties of advanced market capitalism, varieties of transition among socialist economies, and alternative paths among developing economies, with chapters on many countries, such as the United States, Russia, Sweden, China, India, Iran, South Africa, Mexico, and Brazil. It is particularly useful for students to learn about their own country. If their country is not included in the book, as is the case for us as Dutch citizens, it can be useful to supplement the book with teaching material on the national political-economic system.

Societal relevance and normative aspects

  • Moral Views on Market Society by Marion Fourcade and Kieran Healy, from 2007. An insightful overview paper on the key different normative perspectives on capitalism, enabling readers to better understand and place ideas and arguments prevalent in many debates about the economy.
  • Macroeconomics in Context by Neva Goodwin, Jonathan M. Harris, Julie A. Nelson, Pratistha Joshi Rajkarnikar, Brian Roach, and Mariano Torras, most recent edition from 2019, chapters 0, 1, 5, and 6. A useful textbook that treats much of the traditional content, but pays particular attention to questions related to the goals of the economy and the measurement of them.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Molly S. Cato, Maria A. C. Madi, from 2018, chapters 1, 3, 4, & 5. An accessible textbook which introduces students to what economics is, how it is embedded in society and the environment, and major societal challenges, such as climate change, poverty, financial instability, and inequality.
  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapters 1 & 2. Perhaps the most accessible and yet insightful introduction book into economics, with particular attention to why it is relevant to learn economics and what economics is in the first place.
  • To help students get an idea of the main societal challenges of today, it can be useful to have them take a look at reports, such as the Sustainable Development Goals Reports, World Development Reports, and World Happiness Reports. It can also be useful to use more engaging types of materials, such as documentaries and coverage of political protests and debates. Furthermore, it can be interesting and useful for students to also be exposed to material on the key issues in the domestic, rather than global, economy.
  • The Value of Everything: Making and Taking in the Global Economy by Mariana Mazzucato, from 2017. This well-written and influential book takes readers through the history of thinking about economic value up to the present day.

History

  • A Companion to the History of Economic Thought by Warren J. Samuels, Jeff E. Biddle, and John B. Davis, from 2003, chapter 26. An extensive and detailed collection of contributions covering many periods and developments in the history of economic thought, as well as covering historiography and different ways of approaching that history.
  • Macroeconomics by William Mitchell, L. Randall Wray, Martin Watts, from 2019, chapters 3, 27, 28, 29 and 30. This ground-breaking and much-discussed textbook written by three key leaders of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT), describes in detail the history of economic thinking about the state and macroeconomy as well as recent theoretical and policy debates.
  • Money and Government: The Past and Future of Economics by Robert Skidelsky, from 2018. This well-written and insightful book introduces readers to historical and current debates about the state, with particular attention to neoclassical and Keynesian ideas.
  • Capitalism by Geoffrey Ingham, from 2008, chapters 1 and 2. A highly insightful introduction into capitalism with chapters on key ideas from Smith, Marx, Weber, Schumpeter and Keynes, and core institutions, such as market exchange, the enterprise, money, capital, financial markets and the state.
  • Capitalism: A Short History by Jürgen Kocka, from 2016. A concise and yet broad-ranging account of how capitalism developed from early merchants, colonialism and slavery to the recent wave of globalisation and financialisation, accompanied by discussions of capitalism’s key thinkers, such as Smith, Marx, Weber, and Schumpeter.
  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapters 2 & 3. Two short and well written chapters on how the economy has changed over the last centuries and how capitalism evolved.
  • Global Economic History: A Very Short Introduction by Robert C. Allen, from 2011. A brief but insightful introduction into the economic history of the world with chapters on industrialisation, the rise of the West, great empires, the Americas and Africa.

Practical skills and real-world knowledge

  • To introduce the policy tools, reading materials can be of use, but they will probably have the most lasting impact when combined with practical exercises in which students have to apply the tools themselves. For cost-benefit analysis, a useful book is: Cost-Benefit Analysis: Concepts and Practice by Anthony E. Boardman, David H. Greenberg, Aidan R. Vining, David L. Weimer, most recent edition from 2018. For participatory evaluation, the following book can be of help: Participatory Evaluation Up Close: An Integration of Research Based Knowledge by J. Bradley Cousins and Jill A. Chouinard, from 2012. Risk-opportunity analysis is newer and has yet to be explained in a textbook, but an useful working paper explaining the tool and providing examples of applications is: Risk-opportunity analysis for transformative policy design and appraisal by Jean-Francois Mercure, Simon Sharpe, Jorge Vinuales, Matthew Ives, Michael Grubb, Hector Pollitt, Florian Knobloch and Femke Nijsse, from 2020.
  • The Oxford Handbook of Public Policy by Robert E. Goodin, Michael Moran, and Martin Rein, from 2008. An extensive book, which provides a useful overview of different aspects of public policy, such as the role of economic policy tools, engagement of stakeholders, and producing and evaluating policy.
  • Handbook of Policy Formulation by Michael Howlett and Ishani Mukherjee, from 2017. Another extensive book, which focuses on how policy is made with its different aspects, such as choosing policy goals and instruments, policy appraisal techniques, and the politics of defining and resolving policy problems.

A range of analytical tools and approaches

  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 11. This brief and accessible pluralist book contains a useful introductory chapter on the role of the state.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 6. This well-written textbook sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on the state.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapters 14, 15 and 22. This successful textbook provides an introduction into mainstream ideas and empirical findings on fiscal, monetary and public policy.
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapter 12 and 25. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, devotes two chapters to tax and fiscal policy in specific.
  • The Entrepreneurial State: Debunking Public vs. Private Sector Myths by Mariana Mazzucato, from 2013. An influential and well-written book, inspired chiefly by evolutionary economics, on the role of the state in innovation.
  • Alternative Theories of the State by S. Pressman, from 2006. A useful and informative collection of essays which introduces readers to the institutional, Marxist, post-Keynesian, feminist and behavioural perspectives on the state.
  • Money and Government: The Past and Future of Economics by Robert Skidelsky, from 2018. This well-written and insightful book introduces readers to historical and current debates about the state, with particular attention to neoclassical and Keynesian ideas.
  • Political Economy: The Contest of Economic Ideas by Frank Stilwell, most recent edition from 2011. A well-written textbook, with parts devoted to classical, Marxist, neoclassical, institutional, and Keynesian economics and particular attention to ideas surrounding the state, reform, policy and economic systems.

Institutions and different ways of organising the economy

  • The Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism by Gøsta Esping-Andersen, from 1990. This classic describes three types of welfare states, the liberal, conservative and social democratic regimes, by exploring their social policies, pension systems, power relations, and labour markets.
  • Varieties of Capitalism: The Institutional Foundations of Comparative Advantage by Peter A. Hall and David Soskice, from 2001. Another highly influential classic on differences in economic systems, here with a central distinction between liberal and coordinated market economies with respect to industrial relations, social and monetary policy, corporate governance, vocational training and education, and inter-firm relations.
  • Debating Varieties of Capitalism: A Reader by Bob Hancké, from 2009. An insightful collection of essays provides a good overview of the debates surrounding theoretical and empirical controversies that followed the publication of Hall and Soskice’s classic. Besides this reader there are many useful studies and papers on the varieties of capitalism, including of Latin American and Asian varieties. This can be of help as it can be particularly useful for students to read material on the variety of capitalism of their own country.
  • Comparative economics in a transforming world economy by J. Barkley Rosser, Jr. and Marina V. Rosser, most recent edition from 2018. A highly useful and broad book describing many varieties of advanced market capitalism, varieties of transition among socialist economies, and alternative paths among developing economies, with chapters on many countries, such as the United States, Russia, Sweden, China, India, Iran, South Africa, Mexico, and Brazil. It is particularly useful for students to learn about their own country. If that country is not included, as is the case for us as Dutch citizens, it can be useful to supplement the book with teaching material on the national political-economic system.
  • Understanding and Managing Public Organizations by Hal G. Rainey, most recent edition from 2014. A useful textbook discussing how to understand the dynamic context in which government organisations operate and strategies and dimensions relevant for managing them.

Societal relevance and normative aspects

  • Economic Analysis, Moral Philosophy, and Public Policy by Daniel Hausman, Michael McPherson, and Debra Satz, most recent edition from 2016. A great introduction into normative economics, covering its many areas and topics from welfare economics and utility theory to liberty, equality and justice.
  • A Guide to Ethics and Public Policy: Finding Our Way by D. Don Welch, from 2014. A brief but insightful book providing a broad framework for evaluating policy proposals and outcomes, organised around five moral principles: benefit, effectiveness, fairness, fidelity, and legitimacy.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Ethics and Public Policy by Annabelle Lever and Andrei Poama, from 2019. This useful collection of essays treats many different aspects of the ethics of public policy, from monetary, tax and trade policies to the minimum wage, anti-discrimination and social policies.
  • The Oxford Handbook of Professional Economic Ethics by George F. DeMartino and Deirdre McCloskey, from 2016, chapters 25-33. This insightful collection of essays explores the different aspects of ethics in economics, with one part devoted to ethical issues related to economic policy advice and analysis.

History

  • A Companion to the History of Economic Thought by Warren J. Samuels, Jeff E. Biddle, and John B. Davis, from 2003, chapter 27. An extensive and detailed collection of contributions covering many periods and developments in the history of economic thought, with a chapter specifically devoted to the history of economic thought about governments.
  • Money and Government: The Past and Future of Economics by Robert Skidelsky, from 2018. This well-written and insightful book introduces readers to historical and current debates about the state and macroeconomy, with particular attention to neoclassical and Keynesian ideas.
  • Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea by Mark Blyth, from 2013. This influential and well-written book traces the intellectual history of the ideas of austerity and expansionary fiscal contraction, connecting it to wider developments in economic thinking and reality.
  • States versus Markets: The emergence of a global economy by Herman Schwartz, most recent edition from 2010. This book explores the history of the global economy, with particular attention to the role of markets and the state.

A range of analytical tools and approaches

  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 9. This useful and pluralist textbook discusses financial markets from the neoclassical, institutional, social and post-Keynesian perspectives.
  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 8. This book provides a pluralist and accessible introduction, with one chapter specifically devoted to finance.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapters 13, 14 and 17. This textbook introduces the topic of finance in a pluralist and real-world manner.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapters 10 and 17. This textbook introduces students to money, banks and financial crises by explaining recent mainstream insights and empirical findings.
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapter 26. This textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, devotes one chapter specifically to money and finance.
  • Macroeconomics by William Mitchell, L. Randall Wray, Martin Watts, from 2019, chapter 10. This textbook written by three leaders of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT) has one chapter specifically devoted to money and banking.
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapters 22, 23 and 24. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including a chapter on finance.
  • The anthropology of money by Bill Maurer, from 2006. An insightful review article discussing money and finance from a cultural, social and performative perspective.
  • “No one saw this coming”: Understanding Financial Crisis Through Accounting Models by Dirk Bezemer, from 2009. A useful article discussing how equilibrium models were not able to anticipate the credit crisis, while accounting models were.
  • An Engine, Not a Camera: How Financial Models Shape Markets by Donald MacKenzie, from 2006. A book on the performative perspective on finance, looking at how economists’ analytical tools can influence how financial markets work.
  • Behavioral Finance: Psychology, Decision-Making, and Markets by Lucy Ackert and Richard Deaves, from 2010. A book on the behavioural perspective on finance, looking at how cognitive limitations and irrationalities shape how financial markets work.
  • The Routledge International Handbook of Financialization by Philip Mader, Daniel Mertens, and Natascha van der Zwan, from 2020. A useful and extensive collection of essays on different aspects and perspectives on financialisation, a key development of the last decades.

Institutions and different ways of organising the economy

  • Modern Financial Systems: Theory and Applications by Edwin H. Neave, from 2011. This textbook explores how financial systems can be structured, with market and non-market governance forms, different kinds of market activities and relations, intermediation by banks and regulation.
  • Comparing Financial Systems by Franklin Allen, Douglas Gale, and Julius Silver, from 2001. This textbook compares the financial systems of different countries and discusses the different options in terms of corporate governance and banking structure.
  • The Financial System, Financial Regulation and Central Bank Policy by Thomas F. Cargill, from 2017. A book on how the financial system is structured and has emerged, discussing historical and current ideas and real-world developments.
  • Principles of Sustainable Finance by Dirk Schoenmaker and Willem Schramade, from 2018. An accessible and well-structured textbook explaining to students how finance can become sustainable, paying attention to integrated reporting, long-term value creation, internalizing externalities, and approaching equity, bonds, banking and insurance differently.
  • Between Debt and the Devil: Money, Credit, and Fixing Global Finance by Adair Turner, from 2015. A book on the current financial problems and innovative ideas to solve them coming from an influential ‘insider’.
  • The End of Alchemy: Money, Banking and the Future of the Global Economy by Mervyn King, from 2016. Another book by an ‘insider’ which connects personal insights with an accessible description of how our thinking has developed over time, and how the financial system does and should work.

Societal relevance and normative aspects

  • Ethics and Finance by John Hendry, from 2013. A useful introduction into the many (a)moral aspects of finance, such as the ethics of lending and borrowing, trading, speculation, financial products, and regulation.
  • The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and Economics by Mark D. White, from 2019, chapter 17. This highly useful and extensive collection of essays explores the many moral dimensions of economics, with one chapter devoted to the ethics of finance and money.
  • The Oxford Handbook of Professional Economic Ethics by George F. DeMartino and Deirdre McCloskey, from 2016, chapters 14 & 15. This insightful collection of essays explores the different aspects of ethics in economics, with two chapters devoted to economists’ (non)ethical behaviour in the build-up to the global financial crisis of 2007-2008 and the lessons we can learn from it.

History

  • A Concise History of International Finance: From Babylon to Bernanke by Larry Neal, from 2015. A detailed history of how finance has evolved over time, with particular attention to financial innovations, crises, government regulation, and international dynamics.
  • Money and Government: The Past and Future of Economics by Robert Skidelsky, from 2018. This well-written and insightful book introduces readers to historical and current debates about money, with particular attention to neoclassical and Keynesian ideas.
  • The Oxford Handbook of Banking and Financial History by Youssef Cassis, Catherine R. Schenk, and Richard S. Grossman, from 2016. An impressive collection of essays on the history of finance, with its many different aspects, from banking types and varieties of financial markets, to financial crises and the role of the state.
  • The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World by Niall Ferguson, from 2008. A well-written and accessible book on the fascinating history of money and finance. There is also an accompanying documentary by the same name, as there are many other informative documentaries and movies on finance and the global financial crisis of 2007-2008 in specific, such as Inside Job, The Warning, Boom Bust Boom, Margin Call, The Big Short, and Money, Power and Wall Street.
  • Crashed: How a decade of financial crises changed the world by Adam Tooze, from 2018. A detailed and well-written account of the global financial crisis of 2007-2008 and the decade that followed it, with accessible explanations of the technical workings of finance and theories about it as well as sharp descriptions of the role of politics and close up personal accounts of individuals making decisions.
  • Manias, Panics, and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises by Charles P. Kindleberger, most recent edition from 2015. A classic in the genre, describing in a highly accessible and even entertaining way the complex history of financial crises.
  • Boom and Bust: A Global History of Financial Bubbles, by William Quinn and John D. Turner. A more recent book devoted to the fascinating history of financial crises, with specific chapters devoted to questions related to predicting bubbles and more recent developments in China and Japan.

A range of analytical tools and approaches

  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapters 1 and 4. This book provides a pluralist and accessible introduction into different economic approaches and what economics is.  
  • Rethinking Economics: An Introduction to Pluralist Economics by Liliann Fischer, Joe Hasell, J. Christopher Proctor, David Uwakwe, Zach Ward Perkins, Catriona Watson, from 2017. This collection of essays provides an accessible introduction into post-Keynesian, Marxian, Austrian, institutional, feminist, behavioural, complexity and ecological economics.
  • The website Exploring Economics: www.exploring-economics.org/en/. This website provides sharp and helpful introductions into the different economic perspectives and furthermore gives many useful overviews of related teaching materials, videos and existing (online) courses.
  • Alternative Ideas from 10 (Almost) Forgotten Economists by Irene van Staveren, from 2021. This book emphasizes often ignored and neglected ideas, from important economists such as Knight, Myrdal, and Robinson. 
  • Handbook of pluralist economics education by Jack Reardon, from 2009, chapter 6. This useful book on how to diversify economics programs, includes a chapter full of ideas and suggestions for introduction principles and economics 101 courses.
  • The ABCs of Political Economy: A Modern Approach by Robin Hahnel, most recent edition from 2014. This accessible book introduces students to the economy and a variety of economic thinkers on key topics, such as the microeconomics of markets, the macroeconomics of business cycles, finance, international economics, and efficiency and equity.
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020. A useful textbook that treats much of the traditional content, but also consistently discusses the social and environmental challenges inherent in economic questions.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015. This well-written textbook describes twelve central topics in economics at an introductory level, each from four different perspectives: the neoclassical, institutional, social and post-Keynesian perspectives.
  • The Economy by the CORE Team, from 2017. This highly successful textbook, freely available online with additional resources, provides a treasure trove of empirical data, context and recent research.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017. This ground-breaking textbook introduces many of the core issues in economics today and weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge in an eminently readable way.

Institutions and different ways of organising the economy

  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Molly S. Cato, Maria A. C. Madi, from 2018, chapters 10, 11 & 12. Three accessible and brief chapters, with accompanying classroom activities and questions, introducing students to what public goods, commons and firms are and how they can be governed, for example as a corporation owned by shareholders or as a cooperative owned by its workers or consumers.
  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 5. A short well-written chapter on different economic actors and organisational forms, from multinational corporations, cooperatives, and labour unions, to governments and a variety of international organisations.
  • Organisations: A Very Short Introduction by Mary Jo Hatch, from 2011. A brief, accessible and yet highly informative book full of scientific theories and ideas on what organisations are, how they can be structured, how they change, and their internal dynamics and interaction with markets and society.
  • Governing the Commons: The Evolution of Institutions for Collective Action by Elinor Ostrom, most recent edition from 2015, chapters 1, 2 & 3. A sharp and rigorous discussion of commons, how they are different from markets and hierarchies, how we should theorize them and real-world examples that help us better understand how they can be successful.
  • Contemporary Capitalism: The Embeddedness of Institutions by J. Rogers Hollingsworth and Robert Boyer, most recent edition from 2012, chapter 1. An instructive analytical introduction and overview of different coordination and allocation mechanisms, such as markets, public and private hierarchies, networks, communities and associations.  

Societal relevance and normative aspects

  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapters 1 & 2. Perhaps the most accessible and yet insightful introduction book into economics, with particular attention to why it is relevant to learn economics and what economics is in the first place.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Molly S. Cato, Maria A. C. Madi, from 2018, chapters 1, 3, 4, & 5. An accessible textbook which introduces students to what economics is, how it is embedded in society and the environment, and major societal challenges, such as climate change, poverty, financial instability, and inequality.
  • Principles of economics in context by Neva Goodwin, Jonathan M. Harris, Julie A. Nelson, Brian Roach, Mariano Torras, most recent edition from 2019, chapters 0, 1, 20, and 21. This economics textbook covers much of the traditional economic topics, but pays more attention to why studying the economy is relevant and concerns, such as human wellbeing, ecological sustainability, distributional equity, and the quality of employment.
  • To help students get an idea of the main societal challenges of today, it can be useful to have them take a look at reports, such as the Sustainable Development Goals Reports, World Development Reports, and World Happiness Reports. It can also be useful to use more engaging types of materials, such as documentaries and coverage of political protests and debates. Furthermore, it can be interesting and useful for students to also be exposed to material on the key issues in the domestic, rather than global, economy.
  • Economists and Societies by Marion Fourcade. This book presents a great historical overview of the societal role economists have had in the United States, Britain and France. For students of one of these countries, reading the introduction, conclusion and chapter devoted to their country can be very insightful in better understanding the role of economists in their society. For courses taught in other countries, it would help to find similar material on their own country. For us as Dutch citizens, for example, an useful additional resource would be the book Telgen van Tinbergen: Het verhaal van de Nederlandse economen by Harry van Dalen and Arjo Klamer, from 1996. 

History

  • Capitalism: A Short History by Jürgen Kocka, from 2016. A concise and yet broad-ranging account of how capitalism developed from early merchants, colonialism and slavery to the recent wave of globalization and financialization, accompanied by discussions of capitalism’s key thinkers, such as Smith, Marx, Weber, and Schumpeter.
  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapters 2 & 3. Two short and well written chapters on how the economy has changed over the last centuries and how capitalism evolved.
  • Global Economic History: A Very Short Introduction by Robert C. Allen, from 2011. A brief but insightful introduction into the economic history of the world with chapters on industrialization, the rise of the West, great empires, the Americas and Africa.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapter 1.
  • The Worldly Philosophers: The Lives, Times and Ideas of the Great Economic Thinkers by Robert Heilbroner, most recent edition from 1999. While first published in 1953, it remains perhaps the best introduction into the history of economic thought to this day. In a remarkably well-written and accessible manner it discusses the ideas of key economists and puts them into historical context.
  • Grand Pursuit: The Story of Economic Genius by Sylvia Naser, from 2012. Another very accessible but more recent book introducing the history of economic thought through captivating narratives.

Practical skills and real-world knowledge

  • Environmental Policy: An Introduction by Barry C. Field, from 2007. This accessible book introduces students in a systematic way to the different environmental policy options, domains and actors.
  • Environmental Policy by Jane Roberts, most recent edition from 2011. This multidisciplinary introduction explores what causes, or prevents, effective environmental policy at the level of the firm, nation state and international level.
  • To introduce the policy tools, reading materials can be of use, but they will probably have the most lasting impact when combined with practical exercises in which students have to apply the tools themselves.
    • For cost-benefit analysis, a useful book is: Cost-Benefit Analysis: Concepts and Practice by Anthony E. Boardman, David H. Greenberg, Aidan R. Vining, David L. Weimer, most recent edition from 2018.
    • For participatory evaluation, the following book can be of help: Participatory Evaluation Up Close: An Integration of Research Based Knowledge by J. Bradley Cousins and Jill A. Chouinard, from 2012.
    • Risk-opportunity analysis is newer and has yet to be explained in a textbook, but an useful working paper explaining the tool and providing examples of applications is: Risk-opportunity analysis for transformative policy design and appraisal by Jean-Francois Mercure, Simon Sharpe, Jorge Vinuales, Matthew Ives, Michael Grubb, Hector Pollitt, Florian Knobloch and Femke Nijsse, from 2020.

A range of analytical tools and approaches

  • Handbook of pluralist economics education by Jack Reardon, from 2009, chapters 12 and 15. This useful book on how to diversify economics programs, includes two chapters full of ideas and suggestions for courses on sustainability and green economics. 
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 13 This well-written textbook sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on nature.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapter 3. This ground-breaking textbook introduces the environment, resources and sustainability and weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapter 20. This successful textbook provides an introduction into economics of the environment. 
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapters 13, 21, and 33. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, devotes three chapters to the environment, broader measurement, and sustainability. 
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapter 30. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including a chapter on the economy and the environment.
  • Polycentric systems for coping with collective action and global environmental change by Elinor Ostrom, from 2010. This article, written from an institutional perspective, argues for tackling climate change on multiple scales and levels, rather than focusing only on global efforts, as this can prevent inaction and allow for more experimentation and learning. 
  • A review on circular economy: the expected transition to a balanced interplay of environmental and economic systems by Patrizia Ghisellini, Catia Cialani, and S. Ulgiati, from 2016. This article provides an overview of the literature on the circular economy.
  • Rethinking the Economics of Land and Housing by Josh Ryan-Collins, Toby Lloyd, and Laurie Macfarlane, from 2017. This accessible book introduces students to classical and modern theories of land and housing, including concepts as economic rent and financialization. 
  • Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: A Contemporary Approach by Jonathan M Harris & Brian Roach, from 2002. This textbook introduces students to the neoclassical and ecological approaches to nature and environmental issues. 
  • Ecological Economics: Principles And Applications by Herman E. Daly and Joshua Farley, from 2003. This textbook introduces students to ecological economics and the economics of nature and resources.
  • Dimensions of Environmental and Ecological Economics by Nirmal Chandra Sahu and Amita Kumari Choudhury, from 2005. This collection of essays provides an overview of the neoclassical and ecological theories of nature and the economy. 
  • Routledge Handbook of Ecological Economics: Nature and Society by Clive L. Spash, from 2017. This collection of essays introduces students to variety of theoretical approaches to nature and the economy, from ecological and neoclassical economics, to institutional, feminist, Marxian, post Keynesian and evolutionary economics. 

Institutions and different ways of organising the economy

  • Governing the Commons: The Evolution of Institutions for Collective Action by Elinor Ostrom, most recent edition from 2015. A sharp and rigorous discussion of commons, how they are different from markets and hierarchies, how we should theorize them and real-world examples that help us better understand how they can be successful.
  • Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: A Contemporary Approach by Jonathan M Harris and Brian Roach, from 2002. This textbook introduces students to the different institutional and policy options to achieve sustainability, from commons and property rights to environmental accounting and trade agreements. 
  • Routledge Handbook of Ecological Economics by Clive L. Spash, from 2017. This useful collection of essays explores the different perspectives on tackling environmental issues, various policy challenges and visions for a sustainable economy. 
  • Economics and Politics of Climate Change by Dieter Helm and Cameron Hepburn, from 2009. This informative collection of essays introduces students to the key international players, low-carbon technologies, and policy instruments. 
  • Foundations of Sustainable Business: Theory, Function, and Strategy by Nada R. Sanders and John D. Wood, from 2014. This book introduces students to questions related to sustainability and business, management, finance, accounting, and marketing.
  • Sustainable Business Models: Principles, Promise, and Practice by Lars Moratis, Frans Melissen, and Samuel O. Idowu, from 2018. This collection of essays explores the different ideas and cases of sustainable business models. 
  • Business Models for the Circular Economy: Opportunities and Challenges for Policy by OECD, from 2019. This report explores circular business models and their scalability, as well as their environmental impacts and related policy implications. 
  • Circular Business Models: Developing a Sustainable Future by Mats Larsson, from 2018. A book on how to make businesses and economies circulair, with attention to different aspects, sectors and potential solutions. 

Societal relevance and normative aspects

  • Environmental Politics: A Very Short Introduction by Andrew Dobson, from 2015. This brief and accessible book introduces students to the politics surrounding environmental issues, with attention for key ideas and movements as well as geographical differences and visions for the future. 
  • Climate Change: A Very Short Introduction by Mark Maslin, most recent edition from 2021. This concise book helps students understand what climate change is, what its causes are, what current state of knowledge and research is, and what potential solutions are.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Ethics and Public Policy by Annabelle Lever and Andrei Poama, from 2019, chapters 38-39. This useful collection of essays treats many different aspects of the ethics of public policy, including two chapters on development and climate ethics, and the ethics of waste policy. 
  • The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and Economics by Mark D. White, from 2019, chapter 25. This extensive collection of essays explores the many moral dimensions of economics, including a chapter on the ethics and economics of ecological justice.
  • The Oxford Handbook of Professional Economic Ethics by George F. DeMartino and Deirdre McCloskey, from 2016, chapter 9. This insightful collection of essays explores the different aspects of ethics in economics, with one chapter devoted to the ethics of environmental economics.

History

  • Climate Change in Human History: Prehistory to the Present by Benjamin Lieberman and Elizabeth Gordon, from 2018. This book introduces students to the (recent) history of climate change, with attention to the rise of agriculture, civilizations, the Little Ice Age, industrialization and accelerating climate change. 
  • Fossil Capital: The Rise of Steam-Power and the Roots of Global Warming by Andreas Malm, from 2016. This well-written book provides a fascinating economic history of energy and how it transformed the world.
  • The Economics of Global Climate Change: A Historical Literature Review by Leo Dobes, Frank Jotzo and David I. Stern, from 2014. This review article describes how the economics of climate change has evolved over time.
  • Climate Change and the Course of Global History: A Rough Journey by John L. Brooke, from 2014. This impressive book discusses how the earth and humans evolved throughout history, from human emergence and the agricultural revolutions to the industrial revolutions and modern Anthropocene.  
  • Economic Development and Environmental History in the Anthropocene: Perspectives on Asia and Africa by Gareth Austin, from 2017. This insightful collection of essays introduces students to the historical interaction between the environment and the economy in Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia and East Asia.

A range of analytical tools and approaches

  • A review on circular economy: the expected transition to a balanced interplay of environmental and economic systems by Patrizia Ghisellini, Catia Cialani, and S. Ulgiati, from 2016. This article provides an overview of the literature on the circular economy.
  • Economics of Industrial Ecology: Materials, Structural Change, and Spatial Scales by Jeroen C. J. M. van den Bergh and Marco A. Janssen, from 2004.
  • The architecture of markets: An economic sociology of twenty-first-century capitalist societies by Neil Fligstein, from 2001. This book introduces students to the field theoretic approach to markets, paying particular attention to institutions, employment systems, corporate governance and globalization.  
  • Handbook on the Economics and Theory of the Firm by Michael Dietrich and Jackie Krafft, from 2012. This impressive collection of essays introduces students to the wide variety of ideas on the firm, from Marshall and new institutional economics to Schumpeter and the resource-based view.
  • Classical vs. Neoclassical Conceptions of Competition by Lefteris Tsoulfidis, from 2011. A useful article introducing students to the two main opposing perspectives on markets: the dynamic process view and static equilibrium view. 
  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016, chapters 4 & 6-9. This impressive and extensive book compares theories and empirics on many traditional economic topics including production, competition and prices.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapter 10. This ground-breaking textbook introduces firms and industries and weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapters 4-5. This well-written textbook sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on markets, the firm and management.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapter 6, 8, & 11-12. This successful textbook introduces students to the economics of market competition, the firm, and labour.
  • The Handbook of economic sociology by Neil J. Smelser & Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapters 11 & 19-21. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including chapters on markets, the role of firms, business groups, and entrepreneurship in the economy.
  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 7. This brief and accessible pluralist book contains a useful introductory chapter on the world of production.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapters 14, 25 & 35. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on business enterprises, labour processes and full employment.
  • The Microeconomics of Complex Economies: Evolutionary, Institutional, Neoclassical and Complexity Perspectives by Wolfram Elsner, Torsten Heinrich, & Henning Schwardt, from 2014, chapters 5-7 & 16. This innovative textbook makes readers familiar with new insights coming from frontier mainstream economic research, with chapters devoted to new insights coming from frontier mainstream economic research and critiques of neoclassical theory.
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapters 17 & 18. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, contains two chapters on markets with and without power. 

Institutions and different ways of organising the economy

  • Contemporary Capitalism: The Embeddedness of Institutions by J. Rogers Hollingsworth and Robert Boyer, most recent edition from 2012. An instructive analytical introduction and overview of different coordination and allocation mechanisms, such as markets, public and private hierarchies, networks, communities and associations. 
  • Handbook of Economic Organization: Integrating Economic and Organization Theory by Anna Grandori, from 2013, part VI. A useful collection of essays on economic organization, with eight chapters devoted to different forms of economic organizations such as cooperatives, networks, and public organizations.
  • Industrial Relations: Theory and Practice by Michael Salamon, most recent edition from 2000. This textbook introduces students to the various theoretical and normative approaches to industrial relations as well as its different actors and institutions.
  • The SAGE Handbook of Industrial Relations by Paul Blyton, Edmund Heery, Nicolas Bacon, and Jack Fiorito, from 2008. This impressive interdisciplinary collection of essays covers many aspects of industrial relations, from its various theories, changing institutions, the interactions between governments, employers and workers, and the outcomes in terms of pay, wellbeing, inequality and business performance.
  • Industrial Relations: Theory and Practice by Paul Edwards, most recent edition from 2009. This collection of essays, written from the British perspective, provides a comprehensive discussion of industrial relations, from the labour market and management practices to government policy and the public sector.
  • Foundations of Sustainable Business: Theory, Function, and Strategy by Nada R. Sanders and John D. Wood, from 2014. This book introduces students to questions related to sustainability and business, management, finance, accounting, and marketing.
  • Sustainable Business Models: Principles, Promise, and Practice by Lars Moratis, Frans Melissen, and Samuel O. Idowu, from 2018. This collection of essays explores the different ideas and cases of sustainable business models. 
  • Business Models for the Circular Economy: Opportunities and Challenges for Policy by OECD, from 2019. This report explores circular business models and their scalability, as well as their environmental impacts and related policy implications. 
  • Circular Business Models: Developing a Sustainable Future by Mats Larsson, from 2018. A book on how to make businesses and economies circulair, with attention to different aspects, sectors and potential solutions. 
  • Understanding Social Entrepreneurship: The Relentless Pursuit of Mission in an Ever Changing World by Jill Kickul and Thomas S. Lyons, from 2012. This textbook introduces students to what social entrepreneurship is and what its key challenges are, from setting up the right organizational structure and funding to recognizing opportunities and measuring impact.

Societal relevance and normative aspects

  • The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and Economics by Mark D. White, from 2019, chapter 16. This extensive collection of essays explores the many moral dimensions of economics, including a chapter on the moral status of profit. 
  • Firms as political entities by Isabelle Ferreras, from 2017. This informative book looks at the power dynamics within companies and advocates for founding corporate governance on bicameralism, meaning that capital and labour are represented through two chambers and together run the company. 
  • The shareholders vs. stakeholders debate by H. Jeff Smith, from 2003. This useful article introduces students to the debate about whether companies should aim to maximize shareholder value or serve the interests of all stakeholders.
  • Stakeholder Theory: The State of the Art by R. Edward Freeman, Jeffrey S. Harrison, Andrew C. Wicks, Bidhan L. Parmar, and Simone de Colle, from 2010. This book introduces students to the stakeholder theory, its history, future, ethics, and its relation with capitalism at large and the various aspects of business, such as finance, management, accounting and marketing.
  • Milton Friedman 50 Years Later by Luigi Zingales, Jana Kasperkevic, and Asher Schechter, from 2020. This online freely available collection of articles on the shareholder-stakeholder debate helps students understand the different positions in the debate, including an up-dated defense of Milton Friedman’s argument for shareholder capitalism. 
  • Change Everything: Creating an Economy for the Common Good by Christian Felber, from 2010. An innovative book arguing the economy, firms and banks should be organized around the concept of the common good.
  • Democracy at Work: A Cure for Capitalism by Richard D. Wolff, from 2012. A provocative book arguing that the solution to today’s economic problems is the democratization of workplaces through workers’ self-directed enterprises.

History

  • Business History Around the World by Geoffrey Jones and Franco Amatori, from 2003. This useful collection of essays covers the history of business with some chapters devoted to general and theoretical issues, such as production governance, family firms, multinationals, and relations with the government, and others devoted to specific regions, such as Latin America, China and Scandinavia. 
  • European industrial policy: The twentieth-century experience by James Foreman-Peck and Giovanni Federico, from 1999. This informative book guides students through the industrial histories of the different European countries, from Germany and Spain to Russia and Sweden.
  • The Oxford Handbook of Business History by Geoffrey G. Jones and Jonathan Zeitlin, from 2008. This extensive collection of essays covers many different aspects of business history, from different theoretical perspectives and the diverse functions of firms to the various forms of business organization and their relation to the wider society.
  • The Invention of Enterprise: Entrepreneurship from Ancient Mesopotamia to Modern Times by Joel Mokyr, David S. Landes, Joel Mokyr, and William J. Baumol, from 2010. This impressive collection of essays covers the long history of firms, from ancient Mesopotamia and Rome to modern Britain, China and Japan.

A range of analytical tools and approaches

  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapters 12 & 15. This well-written textbook which in two chapters set out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on economic growth, wellbeing and poverty.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapters 1, 2, 16 & 21. This successful textbook contains chapters on historical development, technology, and growth.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapters 5 & 15. This ground-breaking textbook weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge, and includes chapters on development and poverty.
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapter 32. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, contains a chapter on growth and development. 
  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016, chapters 12, 13, 14, & 16. This impressive and extensive book compares multiple perspectives on many traditional economic topics including business cycles.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapter 29. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on development.
  • Alternative Ideas from 10 (Almost) Forgotten Economists by Irene van Staveren, from 2021, chapter 7. This book emphasizes often ignored and neglected ideas and contains a chapter on the ideas of Amartya Sen on capabilities.
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapter 29. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including a chapter on the role of technology in the economy.
  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 11. This brief and accessible pluralist book contains a useful introductory chapter on poverty.
  • DPR Debate: Should industrial policy conform to comparative advantage or defy it? by Ha Joon Chang & Justin Lin, from 2009. A highly interesting written debate by two leading development economists enabling students to get a sharp and more nuanced understanding of a key debate surrounding policy.
  • Development Macroeconomics: Alternative Strategies for Growth by Basil Oberholzer, from 2020. This book aims to help identify effective macroeconomic strategies for growth by taking into account the multiple constraints that countries face.
  • Socio-Economic Development by Adam Szirmai, from 2015. An impressive book dealing with a vast array of topics and ideas related to economic development in a systematic manner. 
  • Handbook of alternative theories of economic development by E. Reinert, J. Ghosh, and R. Kattel, from 2016. An impressive collection of essays covering developmental ideas, histories, and issues from all over the world.
  • Beyond Growth: The Economics of Sustainable Development by Herman Daly, from 1996. A useful book written from an ecological perspective focusing on how economic development can become sustainable and move away from destructive growth.
  • Economic Growth And Development by Hendrik Van den Berg, from 2012. A useful book bringing history, normative debates, and a wide range of theoretical approaches and topics. 
  • Beyond Development: Alternative Visions from Latin America by M. Lang & D. Mokrani, from 2013. A collection of essays bringing together a diverse set of ideas and perspectives on development.

Institutions and different ways of organising the economy

  • Comparative economics in a transforming world economy by J. Barkley Rosser Jr. and Marina V. Rosser, most recent edition from 2018. A highly useful and broad book describing many varieties of advanced market capitalism, varieties of transition among socialist economies, and alternative paths among developing economies, with chapters on many countries, such as the United States, Russia, Sweden, China, India, Iran, South Africa, Mexico, and Brazil. 
  • The Developmental State by Meredith Woo-Cumings, from 1999. An informative collection of essays on the concept of the developmental state, with chapters devoted to its various aspects, its economics and different cases, such as India, Japan, Mexico, Brazil and France.
  • A Handbook of Economic Anthropology by James G Carrier, from 2005. A useful collection of essays covering the broad field of economic anthropology, with chapters devoted to different forms of economic organization, world regions, and economic topics, such as labour, the environment, and the 2008 global financial crisis.
  • Poverty and Development by Tim Allen and Alan Thomas, most recent edition from 2021. An impressive collection of essays exploring the causes of poverty and the history, current challenges and future of development.

Societal relevance and normative aspects

  • The Oxford Handbook of Professional Economic Ethics by George F. DeMartino and Deirdre McCloskey, from 2016, chapter 27. This insightful collection of essays explores the different aspects of ethics in economics, with one chapter devoted to the ethics of economic development.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Ethics and Public Policy by Annabelle Lever and Andrei Poama, from 2018, chapter 38. This useful collection of essays on the ethics of public policy contains one chapter on development and climate ethics. 
  • Postcolonialism meets Economics by S. Charusheela and Eiman Zein-Elabdin, from 2004. A collection of essays exploring colonial and hegemonic aspects of classical and contemporary economics and how a postcolonial economics would look.
  • Postdevelopment in Practice: Alternatives, Economies, Ontologies by Elise Klein and Carlos Eduardo Morreo, from 2019. This collection of essays explores the concept and practices of postdevelopment from multiple theoretical, social and geographical perspectives.
  • Globalization and the Postcolonial World: The New Political Economy of Development by Ankie Hoogvelt, from 1997. This book introduces students to different perspectives on economic development and the historical postcolonial developments of Africa, the Islamic world, East Asia and Latin America. 

History

  • The Wealth and Poverty of Nations: Why Some are So Rich and Some So Poor by David S. Landes, from 1998. A fascinating history of economic development around the world, discussing the various possible explanations for uneven development in historical context.
  • Kicking Away the Ladder: Development Strategy in Historical Perspective by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2002. An influential and accessible book investigating how the developed countries became rich and how this differs from the stories we often tell about it.
  • The Economics of Poverty: History, Measurement, and Policy by Martin Ravallion, from 2015. An informative history of both the idea and reality of poverty and policy attempts at reducing and eliminating it. 

A range of analytical tools and approaches

  • Economic Methodology: Understanding economics as a science by Marcel Boumans and John B. Davis, from 2010. A sharp and accessible introduction into economic methodology and philosophy of science with explanations of different views on science and key debates on how economics should be practiced.
  • Social Research Methods by Alan Bryman, most recent edition from 2015. A prominent textbook that introduces a wide variety of quantitative and qualitative research methods, such as interviews, structured and participant observation, content analysis, and survey research.
  • The SAGE Handbook of Applied Social Research Methods by Leonard Bickman and Debra J. Rog, most recent edition from 2009. A leading textbook on applied research with attention to choosing the right method for the question at hand, practical considerations, and how to make informed methodological decisions for a variety of quantitative and qualitative methods. 
  • Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Heterodox Economics by Frederic Lee and Bruce Cronin, from 2016. An instructive collection of essays with explanations, reflections on and applications of innovative research methods that deviate from the standard econometric approach usually taught in economics programmes, such as survey research, network analysis, experiments, ethnography, and agent-based computational modelling. 
  • Qualitative Research Practice A Guide for Social Science Students and Researchers by Jane Ritchie, Jane Lewis, Carol McNaughton Nicholls, and Rachel Ormston, most recent edition from 2013. A useful introduction into how to do rigorous and reflective quantitative research with chapters on interviews, focus groups, observation, research design, ethical considerations, and data analysis.
  • Mostly harmless econometrics: An empiricist’s companion by Joshua D. Angrist and Jörn-Steffen Pischke, from 2008. This textbook aims to introduce students to econometrics in a more practical way and with more attention to causality. 
  • Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Experimental Economics by Arthur Schram and Aljaž Ule, from 2019. This informative collection of essays discusses the various aspects of experimental economics, from field experiments and neuroeconomics to methodological procedures and its relation to theory and policy. 
  • Networks by Mark Newman, from 2010. This introductory textbook helps students understand how networks can be studied and modelled, whether one studies a social, biological or technological network. 
  • Social Network Analysis by John Scott, from 1991. This textbook introduces students to social network analysis, its history, concepts and methodology. 
  • International handbook of survey methodology by Edith, D. de Leeuw, Joop J. Hox, & Don A. Dillman, from 2008. This useful collection of essays introduces students to the various aspects of survey research, from survey design and implementation to the data analysis and ethical considerations.
  • The Handbook of Pluralist Economics Education by Jack Reardon, from 2009, chapter 10. This useful book on how to diversify economics programs, includes a chapter full of ideas and suggestions for courses on mathematics. 

Institutions and different ways of organising the economy

  • Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men by Caroline Criado-Perez, from 2019. This influential bestseller draws attention to the ways in which data are biased in terms of gender, with chapters devoted to statistics on work, health, fashion, and people’s public and daily lives.
  • Data Feminism by Catherine D’Ignazio and Lauren F. Klein, from 2020. This book argues data are mainly constructed by and also often biased in favour of white men and argues a intersectional feminist approach can help our understanding of the world and improve data science.
  • The perils of perpetuating postcolonial biases in research by Munyaradzi Makoni, from 2018. This article briefly discusses Western biases in research and provides short suggestions on how to tackle them.

Societal relevance and normative aspects

  • The Oxford Handbook of Professional Economic Ethics by George F. DeMartino and Deirdre McCloskey, from 2016, chapters 18 and 19. This insightful collection of essays explores the different aspects of ethics in economics, with two chapters devoted to statistical significance, and honesty and integrity in econometrics. 
  • The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Economics by Harold Kincaid and Don Ross, from 2009. This collection of essays provides an overview of the literature on the philosophy of economics, divided up in sections on microeconomics, macroeconomics and welfare, with chapters on experiments, computational economics, causality, data mining and facts and values in modern economics.
  • Philosophy of Economics by Uskali Mäki, from 2012. This collection of essays introduces students to the various ideas and debates surrounding the philosophical foundation of economics and its methods, with chapters on econometrics, game theory, experiments, economic forecasting, and mathematics.  

History

  • Economic Methodology: A Historical Introduction by Harro Maas, from 2014. A well-written and useful book on the history of economic methodology from debates about deduction and induction, statistics, modelling, and experiments in economics.
  • Economic Methodology: Understanding economics as a science by Marcel Boumans and John B. Davis, from 2010. A sharp and accessible introduction into economic methodology and philosophy of science with explanations of different views on science and key debates on how economics should be practiced.

A range of analytical tools and approaches

  • The Handbook of Pluralist Economics Education by Jack Reardon, from 2009, chapter 11. This useful book on how to diversify economics programs, includes a chapter full of ideas and suggestions for courses on labour economics.
  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 10. This brief and accessible pluralist book contains a useful introductory chapter on work and unemployment.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 8. This well-written textbook which in one chapter sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on labour markets.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapters 3, 9, 14 & 16. This successful textbook introduces students to economics of work, labour markets, unemployment and technological change.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapters 6 & 7. This ground-breaking textbook introduces work and unemployment and weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge.
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapter 10. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, contains a chapter on labour markets. 
  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016, chapters 4, 6 & 14. This impressive and extensive book compares multiple perspectives on many traditional economic topics including production, wages and unemployment.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapters 25 & 35. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on labour processes and full employment.
  • Alternative Ideas from 10 (Almost) Forgotten Economists by Irene van Staveren, from 2021, chapter 5. This book emphasizes often ignored and neglected ideas and contains chapters on the ideas of Barbara Bergmann on gender biases.
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapters 12, 14, 17 and 25. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including four chapters on labour markets and trade unions, work and occupations, networks, and education.
  • Labour: A Heterodox Approach by Jean Vercherand, from 2014. This short book introduces students to the economics of labour in a pluralist and historically grounded way, paying attention to classical, neoclassical, Keynesian, Marxian and Schumpeterian theories and ideas.
  • Economics of Imperfect Labor Markets by Tito Boeri and Jan van Ours, from 2013. This advanced textbook focuses on the economics of labour market institutions, such as minimum wages, unemployment policies, employment regulation, family policies, wage negotiations, pensions, education and migration policy.
  • The Sociology of Work: Continuity and Change in Paid and Unpaid Work by Stephen Edgell, from 2005. Another, but more recent, introduction into work, focusing on de- and upskilling, alienation, fordism, unemployment, globalization, and industrial, service, domestic, non-standard and home work.
  • The Oxford Handbook of Women and the Economy by Susan L. Averett, Laura M. Argys, and Saul D. Hoffman, from 2018. One-third of this collection of essays is devoted to the role and position of women in the labour market, including chapters on the gender wage gap, labour force participation, racial differences, taxes, and the feminist perspective.  
  • Handbook of Labor Economics by Orley Ashenfelter & David Card, most recent edition from 2010. A collection of essays on recent research on labour markets, focusing on racial and gender inequality, human capital development and intergenerational mobility, institutional reforms and imperfect competition, and lifecycle choices and expectations. 

Institutions and different ways of organising the economy

  • Industrial Relations: Theory and Practice by Michael Salamon, most recent edition from 2000. This textbook introduces students to the various theoretical and normative approaches to industrial relations as well as its different actors and institutions.
  • The SAGE Handbook of Industrial Relations by Paul Blyton, Edmund Heery, Nicolas Bacon, and Jack Fiorito, from 2008. This impressive interdisciplinary collection of essays covers many aspects of industrial relations, from its various theories, changing institutions, the interactions between governments, employers and workers, and the outcomes in terms of pay, wellbeing, inequality and business performance.
  • Democracy at Work: A Cure for Capitalism by Richard D. Wolff, from 2012. A provocative book arguing that the solution to today’s economic problems is the democratization of workplaces through workers’ self-directed enterprises.
  • Firms as political entities by Isabelle Ferreras, from 2017. This informative book looks at the power dynamics within companies and advocates for founding corporate governance on bicameralism, meaning that capital and labour are represented through two chambers and together run the company. 

Societal relevance and normative aspects

  • How is Labor Distinct from Broccoli? by Robert Prasch, from 2003. This thought provoking article helps students understand what the unique characteristics of labour are. 
  • The Routledge Companion to Social and Political Philosophy by Gerald F. Gaus, Fred D’Agostino, from 2013, chapter 65. This impressive collection of essays on normative ideas and concepts includes a chapter on the social and political philosophy of work. 
  • The Routledge Handbook of Ethics and Public Policy by Annabelle Lever and Andrei Poama, from 2019, chapter 23. This useful collection of essays treats many different aspects of the ethics of public policy, including a chapter on gender-egalitarian policies in the workplace and the family.
  • The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and Economics by Mark D. White, from 2019, chapters 18 and 26. This extensive collection of essays explores the many moral dimensions of economics, including two chapters on civil rights, employment and race, and ethics and, in, and for labour markets. 

History

  • The Sociology of Work: Continuity and Change in Paid and Unpaid Work by Stephen Edgell, from 2005, chapter 1. This chapter provides students with a useful overview of how work has been transformed multiple times throughout history, whether it was the emergence of industrial capitalist work, rise of trade unions, or changes in the work women performed.
  • Histories of Labour: National and International Perspectives by Joan Allen, Alan Campbell and John McIlroy, from 2010. This insightful collection of essays introduces students to the labour histories of various countries such as India, the United States, and Germany.
  • Transnational Labour History: Explorations by Marcel van der Linden, from 2003. This book explores how labour movements developed in different countries and in interaction with each other.
  • General Labour History of Africa: Workers, Employers and Governments, 20th-21st Centuries by Stefano Bellucci & Andreas Eckert, from 2019. A highly insightful collection of essays on the labour history of Africa, with chapters focusing on among other things wage, precarious, informal, illegal, forced, domestic and entrepreneurial labour as well as the role of the state, unions, cooperatives, and the international labour organization. 
  • The Worldly Philosophers: The Lives, Times and Ideas of the Great Economic Thinkers by Robert Heilbroner, most recent edition from 1999. While first published in 1953, it remains perhaps the best introduction into the history of economic thought to this day. In a remarkably well-written and accessible manner it discusses the ideas of key economists and puts them into historical context.
  • Work: A Deep History, from the Stone Age to the Age of Robots by James Suzman, from 2021. A fascinating description of how our understanding and practices surrounding work have changed throughout history.

A range of analytical tools and approaches

  • The Handbook of Pluralist Economics Education by Jack Reardon, from 2009, chapter 14. This useful book on how to diversify economics programs, includes a chapter full of ideas and suggestions for courses on money, credit and finance. 
  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016, chapters 5 & 15. This impressive and extensive book compares multiple perspectives on many traditional economic topics including money, prices and inflation.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapter 8. This ground-breaking textbook introduces money and weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 11. This well-written textbook sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on money.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapters 10 & 15. This successful textbook provides an introduction into mainstream ideas and empirical findings on money, credit, inflation and monetary policy. 
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapters 26 & 27. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, devotes two chapters to money, banking and monetary policy.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapters 5, 7, 17, 18 & 19. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on monetary theories, value, money, and banking.
  • Macroeconomics by William Mitchell, L. Randall Wray, Martin Watts, from 2019, chapters 9 & 10. This ground-breaking and much-discussed textbook written by three leaders of Modern Monetary Theory (MMT), introduces students to the different theories of money and currencies.
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapter 16. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including a chapter on the sociology of money and credit.
  • Money Creation in the Modern Economy by Michael McLeay, Amar Radia and Ryland Thomas, from 2014. This article, by the Bank of England, helps students understand how money is created and debunks some popular misconceptions.
  • Where Does Money Come From? by Josh Ryan-Collins, Tony Greenham, Richard Werner, and Andrew Jackson, from 2011. This accessible book introduces students to different ideas about money and helps students understand recent developments and the technical workings of the monetary system.
  • A Handbook of Alternative Monetary Economics by Philip Arestis and Malcolm Sawyer, from 2006. This useful collection of essays introduces students to various different monetary theories, from Marx and Keynes their theories of money and credit to Minsky’s financial instability hypothesis and theories about the endogeneity of money.
  • The Social Life of Money by Nigel Dodd, from 2014. This accessible book, written by a leading sociologist, introduces students to the origins of money, its relation to capital and debt, and a variety of ideas on the social, cultural and political dynamics related to money. 
  • The Social Meaning of Money by Viviana Zelizer, from 1994. This influential book looks at money from a cultural lens, showing how people earmark money and how meaning making processes shape monetary behaviour. 
  • Money and Government: A Challenge to Mainstream Economics by Robert Skidelsky, from 2019. This useful book introduces students to the key ideas throughout history up to today on macroeconomics, money and the government.
  • The Deficit Myth: Modern Monetary Theory and the Birth of the People’s Economy by Stephanie Kelton, from 2020. This influential bestseller sets out the core ideas of Modern Monetary Theory in an accessible manner and argues for changing how we think about and do monetary and fiscal policy.

Institutions and different ways of organising the economy

  • Modern Financial Systems: Theory and Applications by Edwin H. Neave, from 2009. A guide on how the financial system is organized, with particular attention to its market and nonmarket governance forms and the way in which different financial markets function.
  • Comparing Financial Systems by Franklin Allen, Douglas Gale, and Julius Silver, from 2000. A comparison of how the financial systems of the US, UK, France, Germany and Japan are organized and the roles banks and financial markets have in them. 
  • The Financial System, Financial Regulation and Central Bank Policy by Thomas F. Cargill, from 2017. An extensive introduction into how the financial and monetary system is structured, with attention to the role of central banks, history, and the changing ideas on how the system should be run.

Societal relevance and normative aspects

  • The Routledge Handbook of Ethics and Public Policy by Annabelle Lever and Andrei Poama, from 2019, chapter 14. This useful collection of essays treats many different normative aspects of policy making, including a chapter on the ethics of central banking.
  • The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and Economics by Mark D. White, from 2019, chapter 17. This extensive collection of essays explores the many moral dimensions of economics, including a chapter on the ethics of money and finance. 
  • Principles of Sustainable Finance by Dirk Schoenmaker and Willem Schramade, from 2018. This useful book looks at finance in relation to environmental challenges and helps students understand how it can promote rather than counter sustainability. 
  • Climate change challenges for central banks and financial regulators by Emanuele Campiglio, Yannis Dafermos, Pierre Monnin, Josh Ryan-Collins, Guido Schotten & Misa Tanaka, from 2018. This insightful short article provides students with an overview of the issues and debates related to climate change and its (potential) impact on the financial system.
  • The green swan: Central banking and financial stability in the age of climate change by Patrick Bolton, Morgan Despres, Luiz Awazu Pereira da Silva, Frédéric Samama, & Romain Svartzman, from 2020. This BIS report reviews how climate risks, and the radical uncertainty that comes with it, can be addressed through innovative monetary policy making use of forward-looking scenario-based analysis.
  • The politics of central bank independence by José Fernández-Albertos, from 2015. This insightful review article provides an overview of the literature on the arguments for, and against, central bank independence, its consequences, variations and changing character.
  • A Fresh Look at Central Bank Independence by Paul Wachtel and Mario I. Blejer, from 2020. This insightful article introduces students to the history of central bank independence as an idea and practice.
  • Financial Citizenship: Experts, Publics, and the Politics of Central Banking by Annelise Riles, from 2018. This accessible short book helps students understand how monetary policy is made and argues there is a democratic legitimacy crisis that should be addressed.
  • The End of Alchemy: Money, Banking and the Future of the Global Economy by Mervyn King, from 2016. Written by the Governor of the Bank of England during the financial crisis, this book gives students an insider as well as critical view of the financial world. 
  • Between Debt and the Devil: Money, Credit, and Fixing Global Finance by Adair Turner, from 2015. Another highly influential policy economist reflecting on how finance is organized and how this could be improved.
  • The Production of Money by Ann Pettifor, from 2017. This accessible book helps students understand how money is created, what role it plays in our economies, and assesses popular policy options, such as helicopter money and green quantitative easing.
  • The End of Banking: Money, Credit, and the Digital Revolution by Jonathan McMillan, from 2014. This thought-provoking book argues that the digital revolution has fundamentally changed the world of money and that we no longer need banking.

History

  • A Companion to the History of Economic Thought by Warren J. Samuels, Jeff E. Biddle, and John B. Davis, from 2003, chapter 26. An extensive and detailed collection of contributions covering many periods and developments in the history of economic thought, with one chapter devoted to the history of postwar monetary and macroeconomics.
  • Money and Government: The Past and Future of Economics by Robert Skidelsky, from 2018. This well-written and insightful book introduces readers to historical and current debates about the state and macroeconomy, with particular attention to neoclassical and Keynesian ideas.
  • The Nature of Money by Geoffrey Ingham, from 2004. This book provides an overview of different theories about the fundamental nature and working of money and credit in the economy.
  • Debt: The First 5000 Years by David Graeber, from 2011. This bestseller explores the history and anthropology of money and debt, emphasizing its interaction with broader social institutions.
  • Globalizing capital: A history of the international monetary system by Barry Eichengreen, most recent edition from 2019. A well written history helping students understand how money and finance have changed overtime, from the gold standard system and interwar instability to the Bretton Woods system and the last decades.
  • A Concise History of International Finance: From Babylon to Bernanke by Larry Neal, from 2015. A detailed history of how finance has evolved over time, with particular attention to financial innovations, crises, government regulation, and international dynamics.
  • The Oxford Handbook of Banking and Financial History by Youssef Cassis, Catherine R. Schenk, and Richard S. Grossman, from 2016. An impressive collection of essays on the history of finance, with its many different aspects, from banking types and varieties of financial markets, to financial crises and the role of the state.
  • Money: The true history of a made-up thing by Jacob Goldstein, from 2020. This accessible introduction explores how money has emerged and evolved over time, from ancient and early modern history to recent developments with digital cash and cryptocurrencies. 
  • Crashed: How a decade of financial crises changed the world by Adam Tooze, from 2018. A detailed and well-written account of the global financial crisis of 2007-2008 and the decade that followed it, with accessible explanations of the technical workings of finance, monetary policy, and theories about it as well as sharp descriptions of the role of politics and close up personal accounts of individuals making decisions.

A range of analytical tools and approaches

  • The Handbook of Pluralist Economics Education by Jack Reardon, from 2009, chapter 13. This useful book on how to diversify economics programs, includes a chapter full of ideas and suggestions for courses on international economics.
  • Economics: The User’s Guide by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2014, chapter 12. This brief and accessible pluralist book contains a useful introductory chapter on international economics.
  • Economics After The Crisis by Irene van Staveren, from 2015, chapter 14. This well-written textbook which in one chapter sets out the neoclassical, post-Keynesian, social economic and institutional perspectives on international trade.
  • The Economy by The CORE Team, from 2017, chapter 18. This successful textbook introduces students to the economics of globalization, trade and inequality.
  • Introducing a New Economics by Jack Reardon, Maria A. Madi, and Molly S. Cato, from 2017, chapter 16. This ground-breaking textbook introduces trade, exchange rates and the balance of payments and weaves together pluralist theory and real-world knowledge.
  • Capitalism: Competition, Conflict, Crises by Anwar Shaikh, from 2016, chapter 11. This impressive and extensive book compares multiple perspectives on many traditional economic topics and includes a chapter on international trade and exchange rates.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Heterodox Economics: Theorizing, Analyzing, and Transforming Capitalism by Tae-Hee Jo, Lynne Chester, and Carlo D’Ippoliti, from 2017, chapters 23, 24 & 29. This broad and diverse book sets out a variety of theories on trade, global value chains and international development.
  • The Handbook of Economic Sociology by Neil J. Smelser and Richard Swedberg, from 2005, chapters 8 & 9. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology, including two chapters on international institutions, organizations and arrangements.
  • Principles of Economics in Context by Jonathan Harris, Julie A. Nelson and Neva Goodwin, most recent edition from 2020, chapters 7 & 29. This useful textbook, which pays particular attention to social and environmental challenges, contains two chapters on international trade, finance and policy. 
  • International Political Economy: Interests and Institutions in the Global Economy by Thomas H. Oatley, most recent edition from 2019. This book introduces students to the political economy of international trade and finance, with state- and society-centred approaches.
  • International Economics: A Heterodox Approach by Hendrik van den Berg, most recent edition from 2017. This book introduces international economics from a heterodox perspective, covering trade theory, policy, international finance and monetary systems, and immigration.
  • The Globalization Paradox by Dani Rodrik, from 2011. An insightful discussion of globalization and exposition of the international political trilemma, written by a highly influential economist. 
  • Straight Talk on Trade: Ideas for a Sane World Economy by Dani Rodrik, from 2017. This book discusses various issues related to trade and globalization and argues for a pluralist world in which countries can have their own social contracts. 
  • Globalization and Its Discontents Revisited by Joseph Stiglitz, from 2017. This update of an earlier bestseller discusses globalization, its mismanagement, and what policies to tackle today’s problems. 

Institutions and different ways of organising the economy

  • The Politics of International Economic Relations by Jeffrey A. Hart and Joan Edelman Spero, most recent edition from 2009. An insightful introduction into the political dimension of the world economy, with chapters on North-South relations, international monetary decision making, and multinational corporations. 
  • The Global Economic Order: The International Law and Politics of the Financial and Monetary System by Elli Louka, from 2020. A highly informative book on the global economic system, with attention to its origins, major players, and structures. 
  • International Economic Relations since 1945 by Catherine R. Schenk, most recent edition from 2021. An introduction into how the world economy has evolved, helping students better understand its current structures. 
  • International Economic Law by Andreas F. Lowenfeld, most recent edition from 2008. A book on the legal side of the international economy, with chapters on dispute resolution, trade rules, international investment and the monetary system. 
  • International Economic Institutions by Marcel van Meerhaeghe, most recent edition from 1998. An insightful introduction into various regional economic communities and key international organizations, such as the World Bank, IMF, OECD, UNCTAD and BIS.
  • International Organization and Global Governance by Thomas G. Weiss and Rorden Wilkinson, from 2013. A thorough collection of essays on international organizations, with chapters devoted to global corporations, credit rating agencies, and development banks.
  • The Oxford Handbook of International Organizations by Jacob Katz Cogan, Ian Hurd, and Ian Johnstone, from 2016, chapters 16-22. An impressive collection of essays on global governance, with a number of economic chapters devoted to trade, international finance, development, environment, and labour.
  • International Organizations: A Companion by Michael Davies and Richard Woodward, from 2014, chapters 8-10. A useful introduction into international organizations, with chapters devoted to development banks, money managers and international trade.
  • International Organizations: Politics, Law, Practice by Ian Hurd, from 2010, chapters 5-7. A helpful introduction into the main international organizations, with chapters devoted to the World Bank, WTO, IMF, and ILO.

Societal relevance and normative aspects

  • The Global Economic Order: The International Law and Politics of the Financial and Monetary System by Elli Louka, from 2020. A highly informative book on the global economic system, with attention to its origins, major players, and structures. 
  • The Oxford Handbook of Professional Economic Ethics by George F. DeMartino and Deirdre McCloskey, from 2016, chapter 25. This insightful collection of essays explores the different aspects of ethics in economics, with one chapter by Joseph Stiglitz on providing economic advice to policy makers in the context of international economics and development. 
  • The Politics of International Economic Relations by Jeffrey A. Hart and Joan Edelman Spero, most recent edition from 2009. An insightful introduction into the political dimension of the world economy, with chapters on North-South relations, international monetary decision making, and multinational corporations. 
  • One World: The Ethics of Globalization by Peter Singer, from 2004. This thoughtful book, written by a leading utilitarian philosopher, discusses various ethical issues related to globalization, from climate change and human rights to the WTO and foreign aid.
  • Global Democracy and the World Social Forums by Jackie Smith, Marina Karides, Marc Becker, Dorval Brunelle, Christopher Chase-Dunn, and Donatella Della Porta, most recent edition from 2014. An informative book on the ideas and yearly gatherings of groups from around the world that advocate for alternatives to corporate globalization.

History

  • Global Capitalism: Its Fall and Rise in the Twentieth Century by Jeffry A. Frieden, from 2007. A thorough and well-written introduction into the history of the world economy during the 20th century.
  • Globalizing capital: A history of the international monetary system by Barry Eichengreen, most recent edition from 2019. A well written history helping students understand how money and finance have changed overtime, from the gold standard system and interwar instability to the Bretton Woods system and the last decades.
  • A Concise History of International Finance: From Babylon to Bernanke by Larry Neal, from 2015. A detailed history of how finance has evolved over time, with particular attention to financial innovations, crises, government regulation, and international dynamics.
  • Power and Plenty: Trade, War, and the World Economy in the Second Millennium by Ronald Findlay and Kevin H. O’Rourke, from 2007. An impressive journey through the history of international trade over the last thousand years, discussing the various waves of (de)globalization and the interplay between trade and war. 
  • A Splendid Exchange: How Trade Shaped The World by William J. Bernstein, from 2008. An accessible book that takes students through the story of international trade.
  • The Silk Roads: A New History of the World by Peter Frankopan, from 2015. This well-written bestseller explores how international flows and relations have developed throughout history. 
  • International Economic Relations since 1945 by Catherine R. Schenk, most recent edition from 2021. An introduction into how the world economy has evolved, helping students better understand its current structures. 
  • Against the Tide: An Intellectual History of Free Trade by Douglas A. Irwin, from 1996. This accessible book describes the emergence of the idea of free trade and  defends the idea in relation to various other prominent economic ideas, such as infant industry protection and Keynesian macroeconomics.
  • Free Trade versus Protectionism: A Source Book of Essays and Readings by Johannes Overbeek, from 1999. This useful book collects original essays by key thinkers on international trade and provides students with contexts and explanations through a brief introduction and biography for each essay.
  • Kicking Away the Ladder: Development Strategy in Historical Perspective by Ha-Joon Chang, from 2002. An influential and accessible book investigating how the developed countries became rich and how this differs from the stories we often tell about it.

A range of analytical tools and approaches

  • Game theory: A critical introduction by Shaun Hargreaves-Heap and Yanis Varoufakis, from 2004. This useful book introduces students to game theory and its various aspects from dynamic, bargaining, repeated and evolutionary games, while also drawing attention to its core assumptions and the societal implications. 
  • The handbook of economic sociology by Neil J. Smelser & Richard Swedberg, most recent edition from 2010. This extensive and yet accessible book for non-sociologists, provides an impressive and useful overview of the field of economic sociology.
  • Principles of Economic Sociology by Richard Swedberg, from 2003. An insightful introduction into economic sociology, with chapters devoted to different theories and topics, such as firms, markets, consumption, law and gender.
  • Economic Anthropology: History, Ethnography, Critique by Chris Hann and Keith Hart, from 2011. This useful introduction into economic anthropology helps students understand how the field emerged and evolved, and what its different strands and key insights on different world regions are. 
  • A handbook of economic anthropology by James G. Carrier, from 2012. This impressive collection of essays covers the many strands of economic anthropology, from literature on different regions and economic mechanisms to different topics, such as agriculture, industry, consumption, culture, and the financial crisis of 2008. 
  • The architecture of markets: An economic sociology of twenty-first-century capitalist societies by Neil Fligstein, from 2001. This book introduces students to the field theoretic approach to markets, paying particular attention to institutions, employment systems, corporate governance and globalization.
  • The Social Structures of the Economy by Pierre Bourdieu, from 2000. This book presents an extensive and detailed analysis of the French housing market followed by a short introduction into the field theoretic approach to studying markets.
  • The Impact of Social Structure on Economic Outcomes by Mark Granovetter, from 2005. This influential article spells out key insights into how social networks shape economic behavior and market dynamics.
  • Economic Lives: How Culture Shapes the Economy by Viviana Zelizer, from 2010. This book brings together the literature using a cultural approach to understand the economy and markets, discussing issues related to pricing, money, intimacy, care and commerce.
  • Anthropology and Economy by Stephen Gudeman, from 2016. This book introduces students to looking at the economy through an anthropological lens, taking insights from different cultures and paying attention to different ways of organizing. 
  • Institutions in Economics: The Old and the New Institutionalism by Malcolm Rutherford, from 1999. A useful introduction into the different ideas and assumptions of institutional economics. 
  • The Evolution of Institutional Economics: Agency, Structure and Darwinism in American Institutionalism by Geoffrey Hodgson, from 2004. An influential book on the history and theoretical foundations of institutional economics. 

Institutions and different ways of organising the economy

  • Governing the Commons: The Evolution of Institutions for Collective Action by Elinor Ostrom, most recent edition from 2015. A sharp and rigorous discussion of commons, how they are different from markets and hierarchies, how we should theorize them and real-world examples that help us better understand how they can be successful.
  • Understanding Institutional Diversity by Elinor Ostrom, from 2005. An impressive book that brings together research on different ways economies are organized, helping students understand and identify institutional rules, structures and diversity.  
  • Market Design: Auctions and Matching By Guillaume Haeringer, from 2018. A useful introduction into the economics of auctions and matching, with chapters on ecommerce, finance, and healthcare. 
  • Designing economic mechanisms by Leonid Hurwicz and Stanley Reiter, from 2006. A theoretical entree into market design, building on game theory and neoclassical models with the aim of achieving optimal allocative efficiency. 
  • The Handbook of Market Design by Nir Vulkan, Alvin E. Roth, and Zvika Neeman, from 2013. A thorough collection of essays on the different aspects of market design, from stress testing for misbehavior and internet auctions to kidney exchange and school choice.

Societal relevance and normative aspects

  • Game theory: A critical introduction by Shaun Hargreaves-Heap and Yanis Varoufakis, from 2004, chapter 1. This useful book provides an introduction and overview of game theory, helping students better understand its core assumptions and relation to normative ideas.

History

  • Toward a history of game theory by E. Roy Weintraub, from 1992. This useful collection of essays focuses on the development of game theory, mainly since 1945 with the contributions from von Neumann and Morgenstern as well as applications into operations research and experimental economics.
  • The history of game theory, volume 1: From the beginnings to 1945 by Mary Ann. Dimand and Robert Dimand, from 1996. An insightful introduction into the older history of game theory, with attention to early voting and conflict theorists as well as probabilists and 19th century economists. 
  • A Companion to the History of Economic Thought by Warren J. Samuels, Jeff E. Biddle, and John B. Davis, from 2003, chapter 24 & 25. An extensive and detailed collection of contributions covering many periods and developments in the history of economic thought, with two chapters specifically devoted to the history of post-war neoclassical microeconomics, game theory, and formalist revolution in economics.

Practical skills and real-world knowledge

  • The Behavioral Economics Guide 2020 – New Challenges for Behavioral Economics by Alain Samson, from 2020. This informative collection of essays, accompanied with useful resources, provides an overview and introduction into new challenges and applications of behavioral economics, from the COVID-19 pandemic and the climate crisis to online behavioral experiments and the sharing economy. 

A range of analytical tools and approaches

  • Advanced Introduction to Behavioral Economics by John F. Timer, from 2017. An impressive introduction into behavioral economics, with attention to its different strands and relation to psychology as well as its applications to finance, public policy, law, and macroeconomics. 
  • Behavioral Economics and Its Applications by Peter Diamond and Hannu Vartiainen, from 2007. An insightful collection of essays on the applications of behavioral economics, with chapters on public policy, development, wage rigidity, and healthcare.
  • The Behavioral Economics Guide 2017 – Expanding Boundaries by Alain Samson, from 2017. This informative collection of essays, accompanied with useful resources, explains to students how behavioral economics is developing and provides examples through chapters on, among other things, nudging in developing countries, brand loyalty, and choice architecture in retail finance.
  • The handbook of economic sociology by Neil J. Smelser & Richard Swedberg, most recent edition from 2010. 
  • Principles of Economic Sociology by Richard Swedberg, from 2003.
  • Economic Anthropology: History, Ethnography, Critique by Chris Hann and Keith Hart, from 2011. 
  • A handbook of economic anthropology by James G. Carrier, from 2012. 
  • The architecture of markets: An economic sociology of twenty-first-century capitalist societies by Neil Fligstein, from 2001. 
  • The Social Structures of the Economy by Pierre Bourdieu, from 2000.
  • The Impact of Social Structure on Economic Outcomes by Mark Granovetter, from 2005.
  • Economic Lives: How Culture Shapes the Economy by Viviana Zelizer, from 2010.
  • The Anthropology of Economy: Community, Market, and Culture by Stephen Gudeman, from 2001.
  • Institutions in Economics: The Old and the New Institutionalism by Malcolm Rutherford, from 1999.
  • The Evolution of Institutional Economics: Agency, Structure and Darwinism in American Institutionalism by Geoffrey Hodgson, from 2004.

Institutions and different ways of organising the economy

  • Conflict and cooperation: institutional and behavioral economics by Allan Schmid, from 2008. This informative book on how economic institutions can shape behavior, introduces students both to institutional as well as behavioral economics and contains chapters on labour, political, technological, financial, and market institutions. 
  • The cognitive basis of institutions: A synthesis of behavioral and institutional economics by Shinji Teraji, from 2018. This book aims to bring institutional and behavioral economics together in one framework, with chapters on prosocial behavior, cognition, and institutional evolution.
  • Institutional economics and behavioral finance by Ben Branch, from 2014. A useful article connecting insights from behavioral finance and institutional economics, helping students better understand what behavior different financial institutions can generate.

Societal relevance and normative aspects

  • The Oxford Handbook of Professional Economic Ethics by George F. DeMartino and Deirdre McCloskey, from 2016, chapters 11, 16-17 & 20-22. This insightful collection of essays explores the different aspects of ethics in economics, with two chapters devoted to ethical issues related to behavioral economics, the positive-normative distinction, experiments, field research and running randomized evaluations.
  • The Routledge Handbook of Ethics and Public Policy by Annabelle Lever and Andrei Poama, from 2019, chapters 40-41. This useful collection of essays treats many different aspects of the ethics of public policy, including two chapters on the ethics of neuroscience and behavioral public policy.
  • The Behavioral Economics Guide 2019 – Ethics and Integrative Thinking by Alain Samson, from 2019. This informative collection of essays, accompanied with useful resources, opens with a chapter on ethics and follows with chapters on applications to issues such as pro-environmental behavior, gender equality and marketing.
  • Behavioral Economics: Toward a New Economics by Integration with Traditional Economics by Masao Ogaki and Saori C. Tanaka, from 2018, chapters 10-11. This advanced textbook aims to introduce behavioral economics as part of traditional economics and contains two chapters on wellbeing, happiness, the normative aspects of behavioral economics, libertarian paternalism and virtue ethics. 

History

  • Behavioral economics: A history by Floris Heukelom, from 2014. An insightful history of how behavioral economics emerged and evolved over time.
  • Routledge Handbook of Behavioral Economics by Roger Frantz, Shu-Heng Chen, Kurt Dopfer, Floris Heukelom, and Shabnam Mousavi, from 2016. An impressive collection of essays on the many different behavioral economists and applications, from thinkers such as George Katona and Herbert Simon to topics such as emotions and agent-based modelling.